Crocus anther, pollen, germinating pollen

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

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Charles Krebs
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Crocus anther, pollen, germinating pollen

Post by Charles Krebs »

Spring can't be that far away!


Base of anther and top of filament
Olympus BHA, 5/0.13 MS Plan+NFK 1.67X, transmitted brightfield.

Image



Tip of anther with Pollen
Olympus BHA, 10/0.30 MS Plan+NFK 1.67X, transmitted darkfield.

Image



Pollen germinating on stigma
Olympus BHA, 20/0.46 MS Plan+NFK 1.67X, reflected brightfield with crossed polarizers.

Image

ScottH
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Post by ScottH »

Wonderful shots, I'm new to this can you translate what the text means ? (Olympus BHA, 5/0.13 MS Plan+NFK 1.67X, transmitted brightfield.) ?

Thanks

Scott

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Scott, welcome aboard!

Let me take a crack at translating this. Charlie can fix up whatever errors I make, and that will be good because I will learn from them.

"Olympus BHA" is the brand and model of microscope -- essentially, a description of the frame and focusing mechanism.

"5/0.13" means a 5X objective with a Numerical Aperture of 0.13.

"MS Plan" finishes describing the type of objective. I don't know what "MS" means, and it is probably specific to Olympus. "Plan" describes an objective that has a relatively flat field, capable of focusing a flat subject all across the field at the same time.

"NFK" describes a particular series of "projection eyepieces". The job of a projection eyepiece is to take the small image formed by the objective near the top of the microscope's eyepiece tube, and reproject it onto a sensor or film, typically with modest enlargement. In this case, the eyepiece magnification is 1.67X, so the image projected onto the camera sensor would be 5 * 1.67 = 8.35X larger than the subject.

"Transmitted brightfield" means that the subject was lighted from behind and there was no attempt to keep undeviated light from reaching the sensor directly.

"Transmitted darkfield" means lighted from behind, but sufficiently far to the side that undeviated light misses the sensor.

"Reflected brightfield with crossed polarizers" means that light was delivered to the subject through the same lens that shot the image, with crossed polarizing filters being used to block stray specular reflections in the optics that would otherwise wash out the image.

--Rik

PS. Charlie's images are humbling to the rest of us. He has a lot more in the archives, and they are all treats to look at!

ScottH
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Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 12:38 pm

Post by ScottH »

Rik thanks for the translation. I've been going through the archives the last week. The quality of the images on this site are just fantastic and the technical discussion are great. Mr. Krebs has some unreal images I actually found his site first and that led me here.

Scott

lauriek
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Post by lauriek »

Holy cow Charlie! :D These are beautiful (and amazing!)...

RogelioMoreno
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Post by RogelioMoreno »

Beautiful, I like the details of the last one.

Rogelio

Charles Krebs
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Post by Charles Krebs »

Thanks for the kind remarks!

Scott,

Rik filled you in nicely on the nomenclature. A few additions...

An objective designation of "M" usually stands for "Metallurgical" or "Metallographic" (this designation is very common across most manufacturers). This is an objective that is meant to be used with no cover slips, and is often used in material sciences with opaque subjects and illuminators that send light through the objective itself (Epi or Vertical illuminators). Olympus made two series of "plan" microscope objectives that they designated "S Plan" and "D Plan". The "S" in S Plan designates a "super-widefield" objective, meaning it was made to provide a flat image field image over a larger area than normal... useful with the SW eyepieces that see an image field of 26.5mm. I don't know what the 'D" stands for, but the flat field size is somewhat less. So in Olympus "speak", a MS Plan is a "metallurgical" objective that provides a large, flat image (suitable for "super-wide" heads and eyepieces).

There is a huge number of objectives out there, many have special characteristics that make them best suited for certain types of observation (primarily various lighting methods and subject "containment"). And like camera lenses, there are also differing quality ranges with different optical corrections. Here's a good place to get an idea of the markings and what they mean:
http://www.microscopyu.com/articles/opt ... specs.html

Many of these markings are universally used, while generally each manufacturer also has at least a few proprietary designations.

While there are two or three basic illumination methods that are the most commonly used, there is a wide variety of lighting methods that are possible. Each has advantages and disadvantages, and there is plenty of good info available on the internet .

Franz Neidl
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Post by Franz Neidl »

Thank you Charles for these beautiful pictures. Very useful for me are also the indicationes about objectives (for example I did not know was "M" means).

Franz

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