www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - newbie views from a compound scope.
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
newbie views from a compound scope.

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Beginners Micro
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Adrian



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 191
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 12:12 pm    Post subject: newbie views from a compound scope. Reply with quote

recently i changed refridgerator in my home as my old fridgerator is from the late 80's and it was long overdue time for a new one.

on the day my new fridge arived i moved all the food and everything into the new fridge and just let my old fridge to rott, i recently opened it to see if i could find some dirty water, i found some smelly old water!

i made a vaseline square on a slide and put afew smelly water drops on it, upon looking under the microscope, its filled with swarms of little single celled critters,

from watching them at 100x and 400x they are very quick little bugs

at 400x it is visable that they seem to be feeding agressively on even smaller wormish looking bugs with no visable details.

they seem to all go where the little bugs are at. where there is food.
and even they force themselves through vaseline and fight there way through it!

they remind me of hoards of ants because of there brute-like nature, they seem to be very strong but yet they are so small.

they are funny little critters arnt they?


x400
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Ken Ramos



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 7076
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 5:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you do not already have this link, you may want to bookmark it or save it to favorites. http://protist.i.hosei.ac.jp/Protist_menuE.html
Not necessarily the best source in the world for protist idnentificaiton but it is quite helpful. Another good informatioin source is "how to know the Protozoa," Second Edition by Theodore L. Jahn, Eugne C. Bovee and Frances F. Jahn Copyright 1949 by H.E. Jaques LCCCN 78-52716 WCB/McGraw-Hill ( IBSN 0-697-04759-8 ) spiral bound. There is also another publication of which I am not familar with but hear that it too is an excellent resource and that one has often been refered to as "Pattersons." I am sure there will be someone who can direct you to the correct title or you may find it on Amazon Books.

Those protists in the image you have here appear at a glance to be some kind of ciliate but sometimes looks can be decieving. There is also the possiblity of them being a flagellate. Thanks Adrian Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
gpmatthews



Joined: 03 Aug 2006
Posts: 1034
Location: Horsham, W. Sussex, UK

PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 12:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The book Ken refers to is

Free-Living Freshwater Protozoa - A Colour Guide by D.J. Patterson, pub by ASM Press 1996, reprinted 2003, ISBN-55581-275-9. I find it excellent.

My first thought on your image, just going by number and general form was Colpidium, although I'm not sure the shape is quite right for some of them.
_________________
Graham

Though we lean upon the same balustrade, the colours of the mountain are different.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Adrian



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 191
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

initally i thought maybe they are the tetrahymena species of ciliates,
i believe that they are not now,

as i just woke up i automatically attended my specimine slide, to see that some of them have slowed down,
some of them must be exhasted, finally, some of them are still at it at full speed. they sure are frisky little critters

i decided to use the oil immersion 100x since some have calmed down and are not moving around to much.

i notaced that each one has a very long tenticale
allmost the same length as there body that curves at the end which they scoop up and eat food with,
ive allso notaced they have a second tenticale that drifts off the slide of there body and acts much like a tail, wingles around abit, could this be a sensory device maybe?

allso as seen they all have a single membrane on the upper half of there body near there tenticale which is of a tipical general size,
and there is a second membrane on the lower mid half of there body, which seems to vary in size,
to the rear membrane there are allso two smaller membranelles on each right and left sides.

there body shape tends to be somewhat like a ciliate, a very oval shape, very flexable and tends to deform as they move aganst objects and other critters,
allso when the poor things pass away they become the shape of a sphere.

so ive come to the conclusion that they are not tetrahymena from my closer observations at 1000x, but i still have not identified them

but i believe they are less like cilicates and more like flagellated protists, i think your right ken


100xoil objective brightfeild

Thanks.

Adrian.


Last edited by Adrian on Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:11 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
gpmatthews



Joined: 03 Aug 2006
Posts: 1034
Location: Horsham, W. Sussex, UK

PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, this closer view looks like they are flagellates - difficult to say quite which sort...
_________________
Graham

Though we lean upon the same balustrade, the colours of the mountain are different.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Ken Ramos



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 7076
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 6:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, that image does narrow things down a bit, they are indeed flagellates of some kind. As to what family or geneus is yet to be descerned. Keep chipping away at it though, someone will undoubtlely come up with an ID, they usually do! Laughing Thanks Adrian Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Beginners Micro All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group