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Interesting Cactus

 
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2541
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Jul 04, 2009 12:13 pm    Post subject: Interesting Cactus Reply with quote


_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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elf



Joined: 18 Nov 2007
Posts: 1356

PostPosted: Sat Jul 04, 2009 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is it a Kaleidescope Cactus? Smile It looks like it could have been created in one?
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 19326
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jul 04, 2009 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reminds me a bit of a Tent Caterpillar (Malacosoma). But everything seems a bit off for that. What is it really?

--Rik
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Aynia



Joined: 01 May 2008
Posts: 724
Location: Europe somewhere

PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2009 1:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

wow. My first reaction to this was... caterpillar too! Very Happy
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2541
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2009 9:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, it sure looks like a couple of segments from a Gypsy Moth caterpillar but I prefer Elf's interpretation: a "Kaleidescope Cactus".

Below is the full frame from which the crop was made.

Gypsy Moths are odd in that, introduced into North America (from Europe) where they have reached pest status and are surviving pesticide assaults, they have become extinct in the UK.

_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 19326
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2009 10:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gypsy moth, eh? That would explain my ignorance -- I've never seen one of those. Poking around on the web, I can't find anything that quite matches this pattern of tubercles and coloration. Do gypsy moths have a lot of individual variation, or change appearance a lot as they molt?

By the way, what's the technical information for this beautiful image? I'm presuming it's stacked, but how and where?

--Rik
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2541
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Jul 05, 2009 2:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

RE: ID. Hey Rik don't scare me like that! Never really thought about it, just intuitively knew (thought I knew) it was a Gypsy Moth.
Anyway it is, decent image on BG:
HERE

Technical stuff: basic;D90 200AF Micro Nikkor (used MF), 57 frames @ 0.1mm, ZS PMax (what else would anyone use?).

How and where:
Feeding on a Maple leaf, too windy outside so brought it indoors.
Actually it was incredibly docile - in fact too docile. It was alive and feeding when collected, next morning it was on this leaf and did not move a whisker - was dead the next am. Quite certain it was infected with a virus; that's a good way to keep bugs still.

Simple questions can lead to complex answers, wish I had kept it as a Kaleidoscope Cactus.
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
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