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Fall Fruit - Yew, NEW image added
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2540
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 1:42 pm    Post subject: Fall Fruit - Yew, NEW image added Reply with quote


Fruit diameter 11.0 mm; crop from full frame insert.
Running out of subjects, one of the few berries on my wife's Taxus.
Apparently all parts of the tree are poisonous except the fleshy red berry encasing the seed. One site recommends that you spit out the single central seed (poisonous) when eating the fruit. I think it would be safer not to even attempt to eat the fruit.
D2Xs, 12cm extension, reversed MF 105mm Micro Nikkor at full extension, f/8 on lens, single SB800 flash; 67 exposures at 0.2mm, HF 4.1 stack


Last edited by NikonUser on Mon Oct 06, 2008 6:35 am; edited 1 time in total
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P_T



Joined: 19 Jul 2008
Posts: 461
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Aww... I was gonna ask if it's edible... Looks so delicious. I wouldn't mind trying it though, if I could eat Japanese fugu, I sure as heck can try this.

You made that berry looks so tempting in the photo... in other word, great capture!! Very Happy
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lauriek
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Joined: 25 Nov 2007
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Location: South East UK

PostPosted: Sun Sep 21, 2008 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice shots, these are photogenic things. I love the way these catch the evening light sometimes, they seem to glow!

I didn't know the red bits were edible, I was under the impression the whole Yew was poisonous - I'll have to have a look into that as I could harvest gallons of those! Smile
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Aynia



Joined: 01 May 2008
Posts: 724
Location: Europe somewhere

PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 1:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lovely photos. Like Laurie, I thought these were deadly poisonous. We were warned off them as children and I haven't really got over my phobia of them.
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beetleman



Joined: 04 Aug 2006
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Location: Southern New Hampshire USA

PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 5:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I took a regular picture of the berries on my yew this weekend but this is probably the best one I have seen of this subject so you will never see mine Laughing
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
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Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 6:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lovely shot but, on this occasion, I would like to have seen a little more colour saturation from underexposing by up to half a stop.

The soft flesh is edible but the seeds are poisonous, as is every other part of the tree.

Some lore: http://www.whitedragon.org.uk/articles/yew.htm

(That was substantially what was said of elder, but I have consumed hundreds of seeds in jam).

Harold
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
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Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks folks for your comments.

Harold Gough wrote:
I would like to have seen a little more colour saturation from underexposing by up to half a stop.
Harold

Sure I could have made the red more saturated but that's not the way the berry looks. I try to represent the true colour of subjects. This berry appears to have a waxy bloom which gives the berry a slightly paraffin-wax tinge.
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
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Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Mon Sep 22, 2008 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fair enough. It seems that it may be the Japanese yew Taxus cuspidata which has fruits a little pinker than the common species and with the green seed characteristically protruding.

The huge (English) yew T. baccata in my garden seems to be a male, so no reference berries there!

Harold
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NikonUser



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 6:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



Taken in nature, but put in this forum as it is on the same Yew as the earlier image.
Note the berries have expanded considerably to totally enclose the seed.

Actual image in NEF (RAW), converted to Adobe RGB and converted to sRGB for posting here. Before posting this image, and on my monitor, the Adobe RGB is significantly more glowing red than this sRGB.
D2Xs AF105mm Micro Nikkor ISO 400 f/22 @1/30 sec sunlight.
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Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
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” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 6:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The foliage background is more sympathetic.

Harold
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Cyclops



Joined: 05 Aug 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Oct 06, 2008 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great shot there NU,love it with the white background. You know i remember eating one of these as a kid,spitting the stone out as i was told. Also this shows how the plant is a conifer like spruce and pine. Even tho its a fleshy fruit and not a cone it is a clue to its heritage and the meaning of the group name that conifers belong to,Gymnosperms meaning naked seed. Higher plants are Angiosperms. Their seeds are fully enclosed in a fruit. (Technically a fruit is an object that contains seeds. Strawberries are the exception as their seeds are on the outside,each one in its own fruit.)
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NikonUser wrote:
Actual image in NEF (RAW), converted to Adobe RGB and converted to sRGB for posting here. Before posting this image, and on my monitor, the Adobe RGB is significantly more glowing red than this sRGB.

This is puzzling.

When Photoshop converts the image to an sRGB profile, it normally preserves the appearance.

In extreme cases, it may be forced to compromise, for example sacrificing saturation to preserve relative brightness. In Photoshop CS, you can control the compromises to some extent by selecting a specific "Intent", such as Perceptual, Saturation, or Relative or Absolute Colorimetric.

However, I am not sure that this is what's going on in this case. I tested against the first image in the topic (which is still posted as Adobe RGB), and I cannot see any difference between the original and the conversions of any of those four Intent's. This latest image could be different because of the lighting, but I can't help wondering whether something went astray.

If this image really is running into the need for compromise, then it would make another great illustration for the color profiles topic.

--Rik
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
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Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see the problem. I used "Assign Profile" to convert from Adobe RGB to sRGB. This changed the way the pixel values were interpreted by the computer; vivid reds became duller but the pixel values themselve did not change.
Re-reading your original post HERE I see that I should have used "Convert to Profile". This would have changed the pixel values but, depending on Intent, would have kept the original vividness of the red.
I haven't tried "Convert to Profile"; it's too late in the day now, will try it tomorrow.
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NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
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Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Wed Oct 08, 2008 10:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another autumn fruit now ripening in southern England is that of the spindle tree Euonymus europaeus. The shocking pink capsules eventually split open to reveal orange seeds. Spectacular in close-up!

Harold
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 09, 2008 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NikonUser wrote:
I used "Assign Profile" to convert from Adobe RGB to sRGB. This changed the way the pixel values were interpreted by the computer; vivid reds became duller but the pixel values themselves did not change.

Yep, that explains it. "Assign Profile" is essentially what the browsers are doing -- exactly what you don't want. I will fix the other topic tomorrow to specifically warn about that. It's late here too...

--Rik
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