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Peruvian Amazon: Manu/Tambopata Part VI

 
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pbertner



Joined: 02 Mar 2010
Posts: 974
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jan 02, 2020 6:55 am    Post subject: Peruvian Amazon: Manu/Tambopata Part VI Reply with quote

A false coral snake (Oxyrhopus sp.) bears aposematic colours to fool predators into thinking that it possesses a potent neurotoxic venom, like the true coral snakes (Micrurus sp.):



Ant harvesting a slime mold:



Though Cordyceps spp. are perhaps the most well known species of entomopathogenic fungus ie. Insect killing fungi; much to the misfortune of insects, many others spp. exist, like this Akanthomyces sp.:



A fishing spider (Trechaleidae) with has just had its young hatch from an egg case which remains attached to its abdomen via a silken tether:



Net-winged beetles (Lycidae) are known for their distastefulness and as such present an excellent model for mimicry. Their mass emergence is a strategy to quickly perpetuate a 'signal of unpalatability' to predators and potentially to reduce predation during their more vulnerable pupal stage:



An unusual spiny, aposematic firefly larva:



Giant river otters (Pteronura brasiliensis) maintain their status as apex predators within lake ecosystems chiefly through their close-knit social groups. Families work together to corral fish, clear camping and nesting grounds and fend off would-be predators:



The squirrel monkey (Saimiri sp.) is widespread through Central and South American tropics. They often join mixed species foraging groups as a strategy against predation.



Often heard but not seen, the Screaming Piha (Lipaugus vociferans), a relatively large bird, seems to almost melt into the rainforest, despite its ubiquitous call heard throughout much of the Amazon:



Thanks for looking and commenting,
Happy New Year,
Paul
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Last edited by pbertner on Thu Jan 02, 2020 7:11 pm; edited 1 time in total
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 02, 2020 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amazing -- you create the most wonderful photos of fascinating subjects!

One minor issue: for future postings in this forum, please consider starting the thread with the macro/closeup subjects. The larger subjects add to the overall "picture" of your environment, but I don't want people getting the idea that this is a general wildlife forum.

--Rik
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Troels



Joined: 15 Feb 2016
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Location: Denmark, Engesvang

PostPosted: Thu Jan 02, 2020 12:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wonderful and amazing pictures - again!
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pbertner



Joined: 02 Mar 2010
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Location: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jan 02, 2020 7:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Rik and Troels.

Of course Rik, I like the balance that they provide, especially for people for whom the tropics are inaccessible, but I'm happy to confine the sets to macro only as well, as that is what the forum is all about.
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ChrisR
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 03, 2020 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I found the set enchanting as usual. I hadn't actually noticed that some weren't macro - they go to set the scene very well.
Perhaps they could be included using url tags rather than img, if it becomes an issue.
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rjlittlefield
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 03, 2020 11:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ChrisR wrote:
I found the set enchanting as usual. I hadn't actually noticed that some weren't macro - they go to set the scene very well.
Perhaps they could be included using url tags rather than img, if it becomes an issue.

I see that Paul has edited the posting so as to reorder the images, putting the macros first. That resolves my concern. Thanks, Paul!

--Rik
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pbertner



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PostPosted: Sat Jan 04, 2020 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Chris and Rik. I'll try to integrate any non-macros more into the narrative arc and limit them to 2 per set, and keep them for the final images.
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