Bigal River Reserve: Ecuador Part III

Images of undisturbed subjects in their natural environment. All subject types.

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pbertner
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Bigal River Reserve: Ecuador Part III

Post by pbertner »

Clearwing butterflies (Cithaerias sp.) offer a touch of class to any perch on which they alight with their graceful presence:

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A slug moth caterpillar (Limacodidae) might not show the same grace as the preceding butterfly, but its painful urticating hairs and cryptic form are no less impressive in their own right:

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A hooded-mantis (Choeradodis sp.) grooming its raptorial forelegs, keeping them primed and ready for passing prey:

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Flowering plant:

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A dead-leaf mimicking katydid (Typophyllum sp.) moved from a nearby green leaf on which it was feeding to the forest floor so as to better illustrate its camouflage (then promptly returned):

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A cryptic katydid nymph plasters itself against a palm leaf, its serrated leg margins disrupting its shape to help it blend in:

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A moulting conocephaline katydid finds itself in a vulnerable state as its chitinous exoskeleton hardens. In such a state, it can be overwhelmed by much smaller and unassuming assailants. However, once the components of the exoskeleton have oxidized and hardened, it is a predator of small prey, aggressive and resilient:

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Blunt-headed treesnakes (Imantodes cenchoa) are relatively common along forest streams at night. Their large bulbous eyes searching out prey like snails:

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A striped sharp-nose snake (Philodryas argentea) a diurnal snake is typically found in the forest mid-story where it hunts mostly frogs and lizards:

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An aquamarine lichen:

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A Juvenile tarantula emerges from its burrow from which it never strays far. Its game is patience, as it waits for its prey to come to it:

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A spiny orbweaver (Micrathena sp.) with impressive horns:

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Thanks for looking and commenting,
Paul

leonardturner
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Post by leonardturner »

Your gorgeous images are always a pleasure to review, and the identifications of creatures quite foreign to me are an added plus. Thanks for your posts!

Leonard

Howard Mayo
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Post by Howard Mayo »

No doubt what Leonard said.
I think if i had to chose one collection of images that i could take to that proverbial deserted island, it would be yours.
Admired your work for some time now and you still keep amazing me.

Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

Beautiful images as always. The flowering plant is a Drymonia (Gesneriaceae) and those are actually the bracts; yellow tubular flowers will emerge from them periodically.

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