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Bigal River Reserve: Ecuador Part III

 
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pbertner



Joined: 02 Mar 2010
Posts: 966
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Tue Oct 08, 2019 6:56 pm    Post subject: Bigal River Reserve: Ecuador Part III Reply with quote

Clearwing butterflies (Cithaerias sp.) offer a touch of class to any perch on which they alight with their graceful presence:



A slug moth caterpillar (Limacodidae) might not show the same grace as the preceding butterfly, but its painful urticating hairs and cryptic form are no less impressive in their own right:



A hooded-mantis (Choeradodis sp.) grooming its raptorial forelegs, keeping them primed and ready for passing prey:



Flowering plant:



A dead-leaf mimicking katydid (Typophyllum sp.) moved from a nearby green leaf on which it was feeding to the forest floor so as to better illustrate its camouflage (then promptly returned):



A cryptic katydid nymph plasters itself against a palm leaf, its serrated leg margins disrupting its shape to help it blend in:



A moulting conocephaline katydid finds itself in a vulnerable state as its chitinous exoskeleton hardens. In such a state, it can be overwhelmed by much smaller and unassuming assailants. However, once the components of the exoskeleton have oxidized and hardened, it is a predator of small prey, aggressive and resilient:



Blunt-headed treesnakes (Imantodes cenchoa) are relatively common along forest streams at night. Their large bulbous eyes searching out prey like snails:



A striped sharp-nose snake (Philodryas argentea) a diurnal snake is typically found in the forest mid-story where it hunts mostly frogs and lizards:



An aquamarine lichen:



A Juvenile tarantula emerges from its burrow from which it never strays far. Its game is patience, as it waits for its prey to come to it:



A spiny orbweaver (Micrathena sp.) with impressive horns:



Thanks for looking and commenting,
Paul
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leonardturner



Joined: 14 Mar 2013
Posts: 518
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 12:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Your gorgeous images are always a pleasure to review, and the identifications of creatures quite foreign to me are an added plus. Thanks for your posts!

Leonard
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Howard Mayo



Joined: 20 Jun 2018
Posts: 28
Location: Saint Paul, MN

PostPosted: Fri Oct 11, 2019 2:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No doubt what Leonard said.
I think if i had to chose one collection of images that i could take to that proverbial deserted island, it would be yours.
Admired your work for some time now and you still keep amazing me.
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Lou Jost



Joined: 04 Sep 2015
Posts: 3915
Location: Ecuador

PostPosted: Sat Oct 12, 2019 6:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beautiful images as always. The flowering plant is a Drymonia (Gesneriaceae) and those are actually the bracts; yellow tubular flowers will emerge from them periodically.
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