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Peruvian Amazon: From the bottom up Part IV

 
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pbertner



Joined: 02 Mar 2010
Posts: 974
Location: Canada

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 5:12 pm    Post subject: Peruvian Amazon: From the bottom up Part IV Reply with quote

Tiny umbrella mushrooms (Marasmius sp.) dot the leaf litter. Their task of nutrient cycling is relentless and essential to a properly functioning ecosystem.



The cane toad (Rhinella marina) is avoided by most predators due to poisonous secretions from its enlarged parotoid glands. The tadpoles also harbour toxins, making these prolific breeders a common sight in the rainforest understory, especially in the more disturbed environments. That doesn't stop parasites like this tick however.



A brazilian wandering spider (Phoneutria sp.), one of the few dangerous venomous spiders in the neotropics, hugs a bamboo pole with its prey. Bright red and orange markings on its forelegs, in addition to a pink hairs surrounding the fangs advertise its toxicity should the need for a defensive display arise. Several species of varying toxicity can be found throughout the neotropics, ranging from mildly toxic to potentially fatal.



A wasp blows bubbles. This behaviour is generally thought to be a means of cleaning the mouthparts:



A purple inflorescence (Aracea), stands out from the sea of forest green:



The common opossum (Didelphis marsupialis) is generally thought of as cantankerous and irascible; however, they make for diligent parents and their omnivorous diet, opposable thumbs and a fearsomely outsized demeanour make them one of the most abundant mammalian rainforest inhabitants:



The dusky titi monkey (Callicebus moloch) mostly inhabits the midstory where it feeds preferentially on fruits though it'll resort to less nutritious leaves during scarce times.



The howler monkey is the largest of the new world primates. It's a folivore, deriving most of its nutrition from nutrient-poor leaves, which requires a significant portion of its time to be devoted to digestion. As such it spends much of its time in the canopy sleeping.



Thanks for looking and commenting,
Paul
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Last edited by pbertner on Mon Dec 17, 2018 6:24 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Lou Jost



Joined: 04 Sep 2015
Posts: 4268
Location: Ecuador

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lovely photos. I hate those wandering spiders, they can be huge and they can be everywhere!!!! In the Ecuadorian Amazon I have seen twenty or thirty on some night walks, including some giants. Hard to get a good night's sleep after one of those night walks.
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santiago



Joined: 25 Sep 2018
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Location: Nijmegen, The Netherlands

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 11:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great documentary pictures! I've never seen a tick parasiting on a toad. The umbrella mushrooms look like parachuters.
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