Looking for US suggestions for a macro vacation

Do you have a favorite location you like to photograph or collect specimens? Share these locations with your fellow members by submitting each location as a topic.

Moderators: Chris S., Pau, rjlittlefield, ChrisR

Post Reply
themagicdrainpipe
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2014 8:39 pm
Location: Ohio

Looking for US suggestions for a macro vacation

Post by themagicdrainpipe »

As the title implies, I'm looking for a state within the U.S. that would be good for macro photography. My biggest want is to add some new jumping spiders to my macro collection. Ohio has quite a few cool ones, but I am looking for something a little bigger than the standard P. audax. I'm also interested in other new arthropods. I've never taken a photo of a scorpion, so that could be cool. Maybe even whip scorpions.

I've tried searching for a locale that would have something close to all this, but unfortunately Trip Advisor doesn't have a biodiversity slider that I can use :( Thus far I have been considering Olympic National Park, specifically the Quinalt Rain Forest, but also have been looking at some preserves in Nevada as well.

If anyone could point me in the right direction for somewhere they're fond of I would be glad to hear it.
Check out my Instagram! http://www.instagram.com/macrobrice

Lou Jost
Posts: 4341
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:03 am
Location: Ecuador
Contact:

Post by Lou Jost »

I used to live in central Texas and there is a very high diversity of jumping spiders and other things (including scorpions) there. Invasive fire ants have had a negative impact since my days there though.

zzffnn
Posts: 1826
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 1:25 pm
Location: Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Contact:

Post by zzffnn »

Here is a North American Spiders List (that is not separated by states): https://www.insectidentification.org/spiders.asp

Here is an list by states that include spiders: https://www.insectidentification.org/in ... isting.asp

For example Arizona has many spiders: https://www.insectidentification.org/in ... te=Arizona

Nothing specific to exact location though.
Selling my Canon FD 200mm F/2.8 lens

Lou Jost
Posts: 4341
Joined: Fri Sep 04, 2015 7:03 am
Location: Ecuador
Contact:

Post by Lou Jost »

A good general rule is that biodiversity increases with decreasing latitude and increasing precipitation. Florida, for example, would be a really good state to look at.

themagicdrainpipe
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2014 8:39 pm
Location: Ohio

Post by themagicdrainpipe »

Lou Jost wrote:A good general rule is that biodiversity increases with decreasing latitude and increasing precipitation. Florida, for example, would be a really good state to look at.
I believe Florida also has the largest jumping spider in the US if I’m not mistaken. I may look into that!
Check out my Instagram! http://www.instagram.com/macrobrice

johan
Posts: 1005
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 7:39 am
Contact:

Post by johan »

Maybe check out where thomas shahan lives. He seems to find quite a few salties where he is?
My extreme-macro.co.uk site, a learning site. Your comments and input there would be gratefully appreciated.

Ken Ramos
Posts: 7176
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:12 pm
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

Post by Ken Ramos »

The last that I know of, less than 50% of species in the Appalachian mountains have been recorded and cataloged. In some places, like when they were searching for Ted the Uni-bomber, they looked into a cave and reported seeing spiders as big as ones hand and rattlesnakes big around as ones arm. I can believe that. Now, we all have diverse sizes of limbs, though body plans remain pretty much the same so you may want to take that with a grain of salt but the Appalachians might be worth looking in too, of which they encompass a small number of states. During my younger days, I spent a lot of time roaming those mountains and the adjoining foothills and I must say, I have seen some strange things in there but I wasn't doing macro back then either and today, I would not venture into those mountains to any extent unarmed!

themagicdrainpipe
Posts: 20
Joined: Mon Apr 28, 2014 8:39 pm
Location: Ohio

Post by themagicdrainpipe »

Ken Ramos wrote:The last that I know of, less than 50% of species in the Appalachian mountains have been recorded and cataloged. In some places, like when they were searching for Ted the Uni-bomber, they looked into a cave and reported seeing spiders as big as ones hand and rattlesnakes big around as ones arm. I can believe that. Now, we all have diverse sizes of limbs, though body plans remain pretty much the same so you may want to take that with a grain of salt but the Appalachians might be worth looking in too, of which they encompass a small number of states. During my younger days, I spent a lot of time roaming those mountains and the adjoining foothills and I must say, I have seen some strange things in there but I wasn't doing macro back then either and today, I would not venture into those mountains to any extent unarmed!
I actually live in the foothills of the Appalachians, and I know exactly what you mean! I carry a 10mm pistol pretty much everywhere, and sometimes that feels inadequate :lol: I need to get a .44 for that true 'adventurer' vibe.

That's interesting that less than 50% has been seen/catalogued. I guess I had assumed that everything in my backyard had been seen already. I don't go spelunking that often, but I do know of some caves on private land that may be worth a look.
Check out my Instagram! http://www.instagram.com/macrobrice

Post Reply