www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - Pixie cup lichen (Cladonia sp.)
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Pixie cup lichen (Cladonia sp.)
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Administrator's Appreciation Gallery...Macro and Close-up Images
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
leonardturner



Joined: 14 Mar 2013
Posts: 314
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2014 5:58 am    Post subject: Pixie cup lichen (Cladonia sp.) Reply with quote



This small (some 8 mm for the tallest) "pixie cup" lichen is quite common, but seems uncommonly beautiful.







Lumbercam/reversed 50 mm el Nikkor/Nikon D3S/Stackshot/Zerene


Last edited by leonardturner on Wed Dec 24, 2014 10:33 am; edited 2 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
abpho



Joined: 17 Aug 2011
Posts: 1423
Location: Earth

PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2014 6:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very cool. Haven't seen this type of lichen yet.
_________________
I'm in Canada! Isn't that weird?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pau
Site Admin


Joined: 20 Jan 2010
Posts: 4000
Location: Valencia, Spain

PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice!
_________________
Pau
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Pizzazz



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 380

PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2014 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really like the texture and dimension. Nice with the water drop.

Mike
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
JL



Joined: 02 Feb 2014
Posts: 128
Location: Houston, Tx

PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2014 11:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One of the most beautiful pictures that I have seen lately!!!

Congratulations.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
leonardturner



Joined: 14 Mar 2013
Posts: 314
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

PostPosted: Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My thanks to all of you for your kind comments.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Chris S.
Site Admin


Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Posts: 2847
Location: Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2014 12:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leonard,

Captivating image! Very Happy

I've long been fond of pixie cups. Am among those who suspect that Cladonia pyxidata describes not a specific taxon, but a disparate group of lichens that have similar appearance.

Your image does a great job of showing how a lichen is a partnership of a fungus and an alga. Your use of moist conditions makes the algal bits (green) especially distinct from the fungal hyphae (white).

So an image both attractive and illustrative. Yay!

--Chris


Last edited by Chris S. on Mon Dec 01, 2014 11:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
RogelioMoreno



Joined: 20 Nov 2009
Posts: 2953
Location: Panama

PostPosted: Mon Dec 01, 2014 5:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like it!

Rogelio
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
leonardturner



Joined: 14 Mar 2013
Posts: 314
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 8:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to you both, Chris and Rogelio. Thanks to you especially Chris for your earlier reference on lichens; I read it in its entirety and learned much. I wonder if some of the fungal partners in the lichen complex will in the future be found to incorporate some of the algal genes as we apparently have with our ancient bacterial visitors. Perhaps they already have.

Leonard
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Chris S.
Site Admin


Joined: 05 Apr 2009
Posts: 2847
Location: Ohio, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2014 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

leonardturner wrote:
Thanks to you especially Chris for your earlier reference on lichens; I read it in its entirety and learned much.

Oof! Now I feel bad for editing it out. I thought I might have been treading a bit heavily on your thread, in my enthusiasm for lichens, so shortened my response. Now I'm not sure where to find that reference.

A good friend of mine is a botanist with expertise in lichens, and so I've had an excellent source from whom to learn. He is also like a kid at Christmas when someone sends him lichens from exotic places. I once found myself in a bazaar in Kyrgyzstan, pantomiming "hammer" and "chisel" at stall after stall, since I knew not a word of the local languages, and needed these implements to collect crustose lichens from rocks in the mountains.

Anyway, back to your thread. I've seen--and taken--a lot of pictures of pixie cups, but yours is wonderful.

Cheers,

--Chris
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
ckatosmith



Joined: 08 Mar 2013
Posts: 63
Location: Pacific Northwest

PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 10:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, beautiful and captivating...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
leonardturner



Joined: 14 Mar 2013
Posts: 314
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 04, 2014 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks to you both. Chris, here's your reference in case you need it again:


http://archive.bio.ed.ac.uk/jdeacon/microbes/lichen.htm
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 18237
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 23, 2014 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a really excellent image!

I have no experience in trying to collect, maintain, or photograph this sort of lichen. Can you give me some more details about the process you used?

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
leonardturner



Joined: 14 Mar 2013
Posts: 314
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 7:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rik, Thanks for your interest and comments.

I can claim no lichen expertise, but I was fascinated by these tiny cups which were growing on a very damp bank in the North Georgia mountains. They were easily removed with a pocket knife, bringing a few millimeters of soil with them, transported back home in a sealed plastic cup, and placed in a softball size glass container with an open front. They were watered with distilled water on pretty much an every day basis and kept on a window sill. They were photographed about 2 weeks after collection, and continue to look good now, 6 weeks later. The water in the cups is distilled water from my wash/watering bottle.

Chris' earlier comment is well taken; my identification came from a retired botanist who saw the picture, but the world of taxonomy is changing rapidly. I should have perhaps stayed with "pixie cups", or maybe just left it at "Cladonia".

The photography involved a stack of 150 images through a reversed 50 mm el Nikkor onto a full frame sensor Nikon D3S. Focusing was by moving the entire lens/bellows/camera complex by a Stack Shot rail, and images were processed by Zerene. The "lumbercam" comprises several sections of 2X6 wood left over from another project with a ball head for the rail on one end and flexible holders for the strobes on the other. The top section can be removed to adjust for height, and final subject positioning is done via a very heavy derelict microscope chassis modified for the purpose. An earlier version of this with different lighting and lens is pictured here:



The Cladonia image was made not with the SB 800 units shown in the picture, but with a pair of relatively tiny Nikon SB-R200s with the optional diffusion covers mounted, placed very close to the subject on either side. Fired by the "Commander" unit seen on the camera, these can be adjusted to very low power (and short flash duration) individually, with good battery life using rechargeable batteries.

Leonard
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 18237
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Wed Dec 24, 2014 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great info -- many thanks!

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Administrator's Appreciation Gallery...Macro and Close-up Images All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group