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SPIDERS No. 33 – Spinnerets Part 2-Silk Spigots

 
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Walter Piorkowski



Joined: 14 Aug 2006
Posts: 684
Location: South Beloit, Ill

PostPosted: Fri Dec 23, 2011 9:24 pm    Post subject: SPIDERS No. 33 – Spinnerets Part 2-Silk Spigots Reply with quote











Leitz Ortholux microscope
4X Leitz projection eyepiece plus 1/3x relay lens

Image No.1
Image of right side single posterior lateral spinneret and both posterior median spinnerets, at center. The anal tubercle is also visible (bottom).
Reflected diffused fiber-optic illumination.
52 images at .001 inch increments, Leitz UO 6.5x Achromat

Image No.2
Details of single, right side, posterior lateral spinneret. Note that silk gland spigots are being resolved.
Reflected diffused fiber-optic plus EPI illumination.
135 images at 5 micron increments, Leitz UO 11x Achromat.

Image No.3
Extreme close-up of right side, posterior lateral spinneret showing details of silk spigot structures from which the silk strands emanate plus an unidentified feature (top center).
Straight EPI illumination through Leitz Relief Mirror Condenser.
192 images at 1 micron increments, Leitz UO 23x Oil+W Apochromat.

Image No.4
Close-up of left side, posterior lateral and posterior median spinnerets showing details of hundreds of silk spigot structures from which the silk emanate.
Reflected diffused fiber-optic plus EPI illumination.
129 images at 5 micron increments, Leitz UO 11x Achromat.

Image No.5
Extreme close up of left side, posterior lateral spinneret showing details of silk tube structures from which the silk strands emanate plus two unidentified features (top right).
Straight EPI illumination through Leitz Relief Mirror Condenser.
162 images at 1 micron increments, Leitz UO 23x Oil+W Apochromat.

Canon 50D
Zerene PMax stacking.
Processing in Photoshop and Bibble Pro 5.

Walt
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Charles Krebs



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 5805
Location: Issaquah, WA USA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 1:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Simply wonderful Walt!
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Mitch640



Joined: 15 Aug 2010
Posts: 2137

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The images are fantastic. Is that new silk coming out of the spigots, or does she make hollowcore strands? I wonder how she grabs a new strand every time?
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RogelioMoreno



Joined: 20 Nov 2009
Posts: 2962
Location: Panama

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 4:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent!

Rogelio
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Walter Piorkowski



Joined: 14 Aug 2006
Posts: 684
Location: South Beloit, Ill

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 2:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you Rogelio and Charles. Also Charles, congratulations on your Olympus Bioscapes win.

Mitch No silk is visible in any of the images, but any one of the hundreds of spigots will be producing strands simultaneously.

Walt
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ChrisR
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Mar 2009
Posts: 8393
Location: Near London, UK

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 3:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wonderful!
Intrigued by
Quote:
Leitz UO 23x Oil+W Apochromat.

Are you using oil, or...?
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curt0909



Joined: 26 Oct 2011
Posts: 607
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 7:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very interesting structure and well done presentation. Somehow I've never thought to look at one... Last year I read an article that comes to mind after seing these photos. Scientists had successfully created a spider/goat hybrid(it was only one gene from spider). The resulting goat produced the protein that spider silk is made of in its milk. After extracting the spider silk from the milk they would form strands from a synthetic spinnerette. The problem was the synthetic spider silk was only 10% the strength of genuine spider silk.
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Cactusdave



Joined: 09 Jun 2009
Posts: 1631
Location: Bromley, Kent, UK

PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2011 1:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This really is an admirable study of a fascinating subject. Much patience and skill must be required. I am particularly interested in the use of the Leitz incident light attachment which I own, and don't use as often as I should.
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Leitz Ortholux 1, Zeiss standard, Nikon Diaphot inverted, Canon photographic gear
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Walter Piorkowski



Joined: 14 Aug 2006
Posts: 684
Location: South Beloit, Ill

PostPosted: Sun Dec 25, 2011 9:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you gentlemen.

Chris, you are perceptive to note the proper usage of the 23x objective. I am employing an oil that at this point I will keep proprietary. I do a lot of experimenting and rule breaking.

Curt, when you do start looking at low magnification, like a stereo dissecting scope you sort of get hooked. However it seems like a well done stack is the only way to appreciate the complexity revealed by higher magnification. If your interests lie in a more scientific area of the subject, look up "Spider Silk" by Leslie Brunetta and Catherine L Craig. Craig is evolutionary biologist and provides an intensive study.

Dave, this study consumed several months of my limited "play" time, so I appreciate your acknowledgement of such. My experience with the EPI equipment is similar to yours in that I don't use it as much as I should. I also find it more pleasing as a visual vs. photographic device. However if the harshness of the direct EPI illumination can be softened or even mixed it can provide, as you see, some pleasing results.

Walt
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