Madagascar - Part VIII

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pbertner
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Madagascar - Part VIII

Post by pbertner »

Rhacophorid:

Image

Sparassidae:

Image

Leptogastrine robber fly:

Image

Female giraffe weevil:

Image

Male giraffe weevil:

Image

Reduviid vs. reduviid:
Originally thought these two were mating but it appears the smaller is feeding on the larger

Image

What have you gotten into?

Image

Lobster jumping spider:

Image

Robberfly with prey:

Image

Thanks for looking and commenting,
Paul

ChrisRaper
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Post by ChrisRaper »

Great photos again Paul - thanks for sharing. The smaller reduviid looks like a juvenile to me so it might be just piggy-backing on the parent? Just a thought.

abpho
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Post by abpho »

Awesome series. Love that lobster jumping spider.

DQE
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Location: near Portland, Maine, USA

Post by DQE »

The jumper steals the show for me.

The robber is also interesting.

All are very enjoyably and skillfully photographed.
-Phil

"Diffraction never sleeps"

Eric F
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Location: Sacramento, Calif.

Post by Eric F »

Amazing photos and animals Paul, as always! The last shot -- the robber fly with the brown insect prey -- is of a Notiolaphria sp. -- certainly the first field photo of this interesting genus of Asilidae. (Don't know the ID of the unlucky prey item.)

Planapo
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Post by Planapo »

Much enjoyed photos! I think a lot of us would love to be where you are right now, Paul!

As to an ID of that robber fly's prey in the last pic: It looks like a termite to me.

--Betty

pbertner
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Post by pbertner »

Thanks all for the comments!

Eric thanks for the ID, always a great help.
Chris a different angle of photograph shows the proboscis actually entering the back of the larger reduviid, that and its sluggish behaviour would indicate a more sinister relationship.

Best,
Paul

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