www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - Hard At Work On Location
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Hard At Work On Location
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Community Members and Friends
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 5:34 am    Post subject: Hard At Work On Location Reply with quote

It's grim job, having to travel to foreign countries and slog away all day in the hot sun, taking photographs. Someone has to do it!Very Happy

Here I am, together with my wife, in the most recent location, the grounds of the second hotel of our recent visit to Sardinia. The exotic gardens provided plenty of material, from lizards to a mantis to carpenter bees. With three hours to go until dinner, this was a typical, for us, afternoon refreshment break.

This picture was taken by Suzanna, one of the bar and restaurant staff, using my E-P2 and the Lumix micro 4/3 7-14mm zoom, set on 14mm. It is slightly cropped.



Harold
_________________
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DQE



Joined: 08 Jul 2008
Posts: 1653
Location: near Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 3:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sardinia doesn't look all bad! (insert friendly smiles here)

Thanks for posting the photo - it adds a very welcome and enjoyable personal note to our ongoing discussions.
_________________
-Phil

"Diffraction never sleeps"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Fri Oct 07, 2011 11:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The photo shows a rarity, myself with a jug of coffee rather than a beer! Very Happy

Harold
_________________
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SONYNUT



Joined: 22 Jan 2011
Posts: 634
Location: Minnesota USA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2011 12:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You have it way easier....

Wink

and warmer




_________________
..............................................................................
Just shoot it......
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2011 4:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not too many lizards or mantids, eh, sonynut?

Harold
_________________
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SONYNUT



Joined: 22 Jan 2011
Posts: 634
Location: Minnesota USA

PostPosted: Sat Oct 08, 2011 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not from november -june
_________________
..............................................................................
Just shoot it......
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fame at last:

http://blog.sardatur-holidays.co.uk/?p=384#more-384

Harold
_________________
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 3:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

These white flowers, which I have never seen before, were growing on a sandy beach. My wife took a shot from the pavement:





Here is a severe crop:



The flowers have various names:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pancratium_maritimum

Had I known then that they are pollinated by the Convolvulus Hawk-moth I might have visited them in the evening.

Harold
_________________
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 6:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many months ago, before I bought my digital camera, one of the members said it would be good to see what I do with my X-Pan panoramic film camera. Several years ago I asked someone to copy this through his digital SLR. He warned that the quality would be poor and is certainly does not show anything like the detail the camera produces on 100 ISO transparency film. However, by keeping it small, I think I can convey some idea of the beauty of this ice lagoon in southern Iceland, and why I prefer this camera over standard format, without disracting pixels. Yes, the ice was blue.



Harold
_________________
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DQE



Joined: 08 Jul 2008
Posts: 1653
Location: near Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting photo. I had forgotten about that type of film camera.

I believe that some of the new P&S cameras have a built-in panorama mode. One swings the camera through an arc spanning the scene and the camera takes a sequence of photos and then blends them into a panorama. From reviews I now vaguely recall that it seemed to work fairly well after a little practice. No need for a tripod, apparently, which surprised me.

Using my DSLR and a tripod and a panorama head to take very wide photos is a complex undertaking that can require a lot of computer horsepower to assemble a lot of overlapping raw photos. It also requires that (ideally) one position one's axis of rotation properly. I assume the P&S digital panorama cameras just ignore such details.
_________________
-Phil

"Diffraction never sleeps"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2011 11:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Phil,

Way back, I had a point and shoot 35mm film camera which just masked out the top and bottom thirds of the frame.

More recently, I obtained a Horizon/Horizont 202 swing lens camera:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horizon_(camera) (copy, to include (camera) and paste in browser)

That uses a slit behind the lens to do the reverse of scanning the film, much as in those cameras which take the photograph of the year of a whole school in one shot.

Eventually, I could afford an X-Pan which uses medium format lenses on 35mm film, giving (landscape format) the horizontal axis of the frame as 65mm but the vertical a standard 24mm. This is somewhat the opposite of using a full frame 35mm lens on a half frame digital sensor, in that it gives nearly double the angle of view for the focal length, but only across the long axis of the frame. This is possible because of the large image circle of the lenses.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hasselblad#X-System

http://www.hasselbladpages.com/xpan.html

Harold
_________________
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DQE



Joined: 08 Jul 2008
Posts: 1653
Location: near Portland, Maine, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 7:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's a link to an early film-based panorama camera that I stumbled upon today: The swinging lens tube and focal plane slot design is interesting.

http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/cameras/item53.htm

This is from Oxford's online catalog and images of its photography-related museum collection. Many fascinating cameras and much history is provided here. Makes me really want to visit the physical museum! I wonder if many of the zillions of digital cameras will make it into a museum in the future? It would presumably be impossible to maintain their electronics or to read transient digital formats and media by not too many years in the future. At least film-based media can be directly viewed or projected.

http://www.mhs.ox.ac.uk/cameras/
_________________
-Phil

"Diffraction never sleeps"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 19177
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DQE wrote:
The swinging lens tube and focal plane slot design is interesting.

This is done to get a high quality very wide angle image from a lens whose coverage is not nearly so large. The trick is rotate the lens around its rear nodal point. When this is done, objects at infinity are stabilized on the focal plane. So by rotating the lens while keeping a focal plane slot centered on the optical axis, the entire width of the film can be exposed without motion blur and always using the best part of the image. The lens still has to cover the entire height of the film, but no more. It's a very clever and classic design.

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2011 11:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
DQE wrote:
The swinging lens tube and focal plane slot design is interesting.

This is done to get a high quality very wide angle image from a lens whose coverage is not nearly so large. The trick is rotate the lens around its rear nodal point. When this is done, objects at infinity are stabilized on the focal plane. So by rotating the lens while keeping a focal plane slot centered on the optical axis, the entire width of the film can be exposed without motion blur and always using the best part of the image. The lens still has to cover the entire height of the film, but no more. It's a very clever and classic design.

The 28mm lens is only about 5mm diameter and swings through 120 degrees. It covers a 35mm frame 58mm wide (X-Pan is 65mm). The lens swings during a significant fraction of a second and it takes some intellectual effort to accept that can represent an effective shutter speed of up to 1/250 second. Although the results do not challenge those from X-Pan they are on a par with those from typical 35mm MF lenses. I use the camera for those the X-Pan 30mm (AOV 98 degrees) will not cover.

Here are a few shots (not mine) with the 30mm on some of the best film stocks:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/reviews/lenses/xpan_30mm.shtml

On my last 2-3 trips overseas I have shot several panoramic series with the X-pan 30mm, each set to eventually be stitched to give 270 -360 degree coverage.

Harold
_________________
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
Posts: 5787
Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some profile stuff, about lenses, my personal philosophy and practice:

When I bought my first new SLR, a Canon A1, I started on a policy for glassware* ~.

The A1 came with a 50mm standard lens and I couldn't resist the 20mm manual macro bellows lens (RMS). However, I also started into Tamron Adaptall-2, with the 90mm SP macro.

Within a few years I was into the Olympus OM system, in particular for the OTF metering, including for flash, such metering then being a new thing. It came with a 50mm f1.8 lens, yet to be used, and I invested further in the Adaptall-2 SP range, with a 70-210mm and a 24-48mm. I would have loved the bellows lenses but could not afford them for over 30 years. Other Adaptall-2s were gradually added: 17mm, 500mm mirror, etc., with super telephotos (300mm f2.8, 400mm f4) added in the last few years, together with the auto bellows lenses.

Now into digital as well, I am with Olympus via the E-P2 but really into the m4/3 system. Also, via adapters, I can use my OM and Adaptall-2 lenses, plus others, such as the recent Leica-R# one, for m4/3. Thus, I have a somewhat integrated system of lenses, all but the dedicated 4/3 & m4/3 useable for film or digital on a selection of bodies. The ultra-wide angle provision for m4/3 had to be via the purchase of a Lumix 7-14mm.

* My experience with e.g. landscapes has, in recent years, led me to invest in specialist panoramic cameras, the Horizon 202 swing lens and the X-Pan.

~ I am not a collector, buying only lenses I expect to use. I have duplicates of my most-used MF film lenses to cover any loss or periods of repair. With the wideangles that also provides for motion freezing stereo pairs by using two identical camera/lens combintions on a stereo bar with a double cable release.

# The time comes when, especially with digital, small sensors, cropping, etc., a re-examination of the capabilites of the hardware is advisable. I did this several years ago, replacing some of my Adaptall-2 lenses, then for film use, with later models with better resolution. Now, when I can afford it, I am looking at finalising (?) my lens kit with some of the best manual lenses that are not at ludicrous prices. The Elmarit 60mm was the first and I don't expect there to be more than one or two more, with no redundancy to arise. My Carl Zeiss Jenazoom IIs are intermediate. There will not be duplication here, as there has been for my most-used lenses!

I don't know whether any of the above will help anyone but it does help me to consider these matters periodically.

Harold
_________________
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Community Members and Friends All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group