Spirostomum - a huge ciliate protozoan (+ an onion cell)

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

Moderators: rjlittlefield, ChrisR, Chris S., Pau

NikonUser
Posts: 2667
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:03 am
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Spirostomum - a huge ciliate protozoan (+ an onion cell)

Post by NikonUser »

These guys are currently the dominant species in my overwintering pond water (in the garage). Almost too dense to photograph with transmitted light; also very active.
Anterior end to the right; beaded nucleus; striated surface; short cilia all over the surface.
Olympus 10x SPlan achro.+ 1.25x intermediate lens + 2.5x relay lens; DIC.
The scale is a micrometer slide photographed at same scope setting.
Image
Image
Image
NU11016 NU11017 NU11018
Last edited by NikonUser on Thu Mar 10, 2011 12:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Mitch640
Posts: 2137
Joined: Sun Aug 15, 2010 1:43 pm

Post by Mitch640 »

Very nice details NU. I really like the effect of DIC. It can show so much more than regular brightfield.

NikonUser
Posts: 2667
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:03 am
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Post by NikonUser »

It's a pity that DIC prisms are hard to find, and once found are often prohibitively expensive. Under 'regular' transmitted light these beasts are featureless, you just seel a body with lots of small circles (probably food storage particles). I just love looking at small 'animacules' under DIC.

DIC also works well with plant cells. A recent article
HERE
describes how to see onion cells' nuclei using a stain. With DIC you can look at live cells and see the nuclei and the cytoplasm streaming within the cell (the lines crossing the cell):
Image
NU11019
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Mitch640
Posts: 2137
Joined: Sun Aug 15, 2010 1:43 pm

Post by Mitch640 »

I can look at these images all day. They contain so much information that is easy to understand once you see it. I just wish my old scope could do it. LOL

Charles Krebs
Posts: 5865
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:02 pm
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
Contact:

Post by Charles Krebs »

Very nice shots! Great view of the macronucleus, especially that last image.

NikonUser
Posts: 2667
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:03 am
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Post by NikonUser »

Thanks Charles. I'm still not getting the clarity and quality you are getting :(
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic