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Mosquito larva - imaginal discs + siphon image added

 
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2577
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2010 2:12 pm    Post subject: Mosquito larva - imaginal discs + siphon image added Reply with quote

Insects that have a complete metamorphosis (abrubt changes from larva-pupa-adult) develop, what I guess can be compared with stem cells in humans, groups of cells called "imaginal discs".
In mosquito larvae and pupae most of the internal organs break down into a liquid. Except that there are a few clumps of cells that remain intact, these are the "Imaginal discs" which give rise to the adult's tissues and organs.

Top: dorsal view of thorax showing one imaginal disc (red)
Lower: ventral view showing these discs more clearly.
the blue arrow points to the paired ventral nervous system and a segmental ganglion just below the arrow. (I think the nervous
system might be carried over from larva to adult).

Nikon 4x CF N Plan Apo on bellows; 20µ frames stacked with ZS.

NUM10126
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NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

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Last edited by NikonUser on Tue Dec 14, 2010 9:29 am; edited 1 time in total
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Joaquim F.



Joined: 28 Apr 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Tarragona, Spain

PostPosted: Thu Dec 09, 2010 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What you explain about the "imaginal discs" and the nervous system is very interesting! A few weeks ago I found a larva in a pot of plants on the terrace and we took some pictures swimming (may be shacking is best description) in a UV filter at low magnification as curiosity, rather like this is some Aedes specie? I think mine is Aedes albopictus, the "cursed" tiger mosquito that cause quite dolorous bites!
Some recommendation or link for try a specie identification?

Best regards
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
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Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 6:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Joaquim.
This larva was in a bird-bath, last Summer (July). It could be either an Aedes sp. or a Culex sp.
Sorry I cannot help with European ID manuals (I'm in Canada).
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NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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Joaquim F.



Joined: 28 Apr 2010
Posts: 190
Location: Tarragona, Spain

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 10:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NikonUser wrote:
Thanks Joaquim.
This larva was in a bird-bath, last Summer (July). It could be either an Aedes sp. or a Culex sp.
Sorry I cannot help with European ID manuals (I'm in Canada).


That is the "subject" and I think is very similar to your mosquito picture (mine is much worse):



Given that this is an asian invasive species (if that is a Aedes albopictus), which extends quite easily and I took the shot in early November would not surprise me that you saw out there shortly!

Best regards

Joaquim
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
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Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Joaquim F. wrote:
n early November would not surprise me that you saw out there shortly!

Best regards

Joaquim


Not known from Canada. Anyway, it would not be flying here until at least May - very cold here in the Winter!
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NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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morfa



Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 556
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very interesting and beautifully illustrated! I particularly like the ventral view and would love to get a closer look at those feathery mouth parts!

Could you please elaborate on this:

Quote:
Except that there are a few clumps of cells that remain intact, these are the "Imaginal discs" which give rise to the adult's tissues and organs.


(The way I read it, it almost seems a bit contradictory so I'm probably misunderstanding you)
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NikonUser



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Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Dec 10, 2010 1:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi John:
These larvae, and all insect larvae, have a full set of organs and muscles, such as a gut, breathing tubes, muscles to move the jaws, muscles to walk, and excretory system, etc.
None of these organs are carried over to the pupa and adult. Instead they are broken down to the basic building blocks such as proteins and fats and a whole new set of organs and tissues are developed.
But in the larva stage there develops clumps of undifferentiated cells (the imaginal discs). The cells in these discs (the white blobs in the photos) resist the action of the enzymes that destroy all the other tissues. It is these cells that that give rise to all the organs of the mature insect.
It's analogous to embryology where a ball of identical cells (in the blastula) give rise to all the different types of cells in the human body.
Just remember, one cell (a fertilsed egg) eventually divides into millions of daughter cells which form all sorts of tissues. Imaginal disc cells work in a similar fashion.
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2577
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 9:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is the siphon (tail) end of this larva.
MT=Malpighian Tubules (=kidneys)
st: single group of bristles posterior to the pecten teeth makes this an Aedes sp. and differentiates it from the other very common local group of mosquitoes (Culex spp.)
Nikon 4x CF N Plan Apo on bellows, 6µ frames, ZS PMax.

NU10111

Above is a crop, full frame below:

NU10112
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives


Last edited by NikonUser on Tue Dec 14, 2010 12:03 pm; edited 1 time in total
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morfa



Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 556
Location: Stockholm, Sweden

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 9:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the additional info and image NU – fascinating stuff!

The quality of that last image is wonderful! (Impressive how much magnification you can squeeze out of that 4x – is this cropped or are you using really long extensions?). The lighting helps highlighting the different parts – the MT in particular really stands out here.

If you'd ever decide to make an illustrated book on insect anatomy I'd be the first to buy it!
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
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Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 12:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks John.
I have added a full frame image below the original; shows food in the gut.
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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ChrisR
Site Admin


Joined: 14 Mar 2009
Posts: 8496
Location: Near London, UK

PostPosted: Tue Dec 14, 2010 12:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I know it's not the sort of site for comments like, "Sheesh, Awesome Capture" but one is impressed. Very Happy
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