www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - The lowly tomato (movie added)
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
The lowly tomato (movie added)

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
elf



Joined: 18 Nov 2007
Posts: 1391

PostPosted: Thu Aug 05, 2010 9:08 pm    Post subject: The lowly tomato (movie added) Reply with quote

can be quite pretty:



This is a 2X2 focus stacked pano using a Konica Hexanon 50mm f/1.8 lens @ f/5.6. The blossom on the right started to wilt in the 4th frame, so there is a bit of smearing in the focus stack that I haven't figured out how to cure.


Last edited by elf on Thu Aug 05, 2010 11:58 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20640
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Aug 05, 2010 9:54 pm    Post subject: Re: The lowly tomato Reply with quote

elf wrote:
can be quite pretty:

Indeed. Very nice!

Quote:
The blossom on the right started to wilt in the 4th frame, so there is a bit of smearing in the focus stack that I haven't figured out how to cure.

Retouch from individual frames, maybe? If the subject was wilting slowly enough that it's sharp frame by frame, then the smeared appearance probably results from stack output showing the petal in two or more different positions at once. By retouching from individual frames, you can visually choose where to "draw the lines" so as to eliminate duplication, probably with a modest loss of focus that would be much less noticeable.

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
elf



Joined: 18 Nov 2007
Posts: 1391

PostPosted: Thu Aug 05, 2010 11:52 pm    Post subject: Re: The lowly tomato Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
elf wrote:
can be quite pretty:

Indeed. Very nice!

Quote:
The blossom on the right started to wilt in the 4th frame, so there is a bit of smearing in the focus stack that I haven't figured out how to cure.

Retouch from individual frames, maybe? If the subject was wilting slowly enough that it's sharp frame by frame, then the smeared appearance probably results from stack output showing the petal in two or more different positions at once. By retouching from individual frames, you can visually choose where to "draw the lines" so as to eliminate duplication, probably with a modest loss of focus that would be much less noticeable.

--Rik


Fortunately the last frame is mostly stem, so I may be able to get a better stack by doing a set of smaller stacks. Here's a video that shows how much movement there was. The elapsed time for the video was 28 minutes (163 frames).

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v649/etfrench/?action=view&current=TomatoTime.mp4
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20640
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 06, 2010 12:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I see what you mean. That's pretty extreme movement. I'm kind of astonished that the result looks as good as it does!

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
elf



Joined: 18 Nov 2007
Posts: 1391

PostPosted: Sat Aug 07, 2010 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Here's the revision:


Instead of trying to retouch in Zerene Stacker I did the following:
    Selected the frames for just the stems
    Imported them into Photoshop as a single layered image using the 'Load Files into Stack...'
    Cropped the image so just the stems were left
    Exported the layers to files
    Ran Zerene Stacker PMax stack on these files
    Added the output to the original stitched image
    Used the transform tool in Photoshop to align the output with the original


Zerene Stacker did a much better job of aligning the cropped images even though there was still a lot of movement in the stems. Considering the extreme amount of movement in the subject, I'm pleased with the image.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group