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Variations on a theme

 
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 8:19 am    Post subject: Variations on a theme Reply with quote

'Jaws' of dragonfly larvae.
Both of these guys are predators that catch live prey with these 'jaws'. The same basic design but different 'teeth' pattern.

reversed 50/2.8 El Nikkor enlarging lens @ f/5.6; about 4x magn. on a 23.6 mm sensor; single flash above subjects; each about 30 frames @ 0.05 mm. ZS PMax

[I was just testing a new flash diffuser and apart from some blown highlights in the 2nd image (correctable with a layer or two of strategically placed tissue paper), the diffuser seems useful in illuminating the lower half of the subjects.
Details under equipment later].

NU10052
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NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

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Olympus microscope and objectives
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seta666



Joined: 19 Mar 2010
Posts: 866
Location: Castellon, Spain

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 10:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those jaws are amazing, looks like a crab. Interested in seeing that diffuser ;-)
Regards
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realjax



Joined: 19 May 2010
Posts: 136
Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What's even more amazing is how they can lunge those jaws forward in a split second to grab their prey..

Nice captures !
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20029
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 12:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also interesting is that these "jaws" are not mandibles, but rather parts of a modified labium.

See HERE for a labeled illustration and some discussion. Don't be surprised when the article starts off talking about moray eels!

--Rik
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks folks.
I didn't want to get technical but the image Rik refers to is for a Darner (Fam: Aeshnidae) nymph (or larva) where the labium is underneath the head.
These 2 images are from the famlies Corduliidae (Emeralds) and Cordulegastidae (Spiketails) where the toothy part of the labium is in front of the head. So looking at these 2 head on one sees the 'teeth' as in my images.
Looking at a Darner head on you just see a bit of the the two spikes, beneath the head.
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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The BAT



Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 111
Location: Ballarat, Australia

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 6:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Geez fellas,

Lucky our 'puters have got spell check. . .

labia/labium. . . . Shocked

kinda gets confusing for us non-scientific type folks. . . . Confused

Bruce
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Bruce, Blame Rik
I was happy with Jaws and Teeth, in inverted commas of course.
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20029
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Geez indeed...and just when I was getting single- versus double-quotes under control, and deciding whether 'Jaws' and "jaws" were the same... Wait, what's an "inverted comma"? And where is that "tearing hair out" emoticon??

Bruce, did you look at the illustration on the page that I linked to? Sorry I can't in-line it, but the exact illustration is HERE. Or were you, ahem, referring to the fact that these words are sometimes used to refer to body parts of other than insects?

--Rik
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The BAT



Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 111
Location: Ballarat, Australia

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
Geez indeed...Bruce were you, ahem, referring to the fact that these words are sometimes used to refer to body parts of other than insects?

--Rik


Hi Rik, do I have to go to my corner. . . again? . . . Crying or Very sad
Honest Rik, I just knew that if you get caught playin wiff wimmen ya can git bit! But I had no idea them things had fangs like 'that' in 'em. . . Shocked

I'm going to my corner now. . . . Arrow Arrow Arrow

Bruce
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20029
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 8:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I fear my entomological background is showing. Laughing

I actually did not see the double entendre until after I searched the page for "labia" (it wasn't there) and then did a Google define: labia to see what else you might be talking about.

I suppose I can claim distraction, since I am simultaneously trying to deal with the image upload problem, but to be honest, I don't think I would have seen it anyway!

--Rik
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g4lab



Joined: 23 May 2008
Posts: 1434

PostPosted: Thu Jun 17, 2010 9:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just to be painfully pedantic it would be Labium (singular neuter) Labia (plural neuter) in classic Latin. It means lip or lips.
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 1:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Diffuser HERE
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
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