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Schneider Apo-Componon
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2008 11:03 am    Post subject: Schneider Apo-Componon Reply with quote

Recently purchased an old Schneider Apo-Componon HM 40/2.8. Very compact lens and seems to be very sharp but has a fixed aperture of f/2.8 which translates into shallow focus. Thus seems most suitable for flatish subjects. 3-dimesional subjects such as fly heads need an awful lot of frames to get everything in focus.
I suspect their new lens, with diaphragm, is an excellent lens.

This is a breast feather, length 32mm, from a Mourning Dove (feather fell out of the bird while it was preening on the bird feeder).
Top image: scan of complete feather; rectangle is area photographed in 2nd image.
2nd image: portion of feather, frame size width is 4.5mm, on the 23.7mm sensor; HF stack.
57 frames @0.01mm; lens reversed on bellows.
3rd image: a 800px selection; the long "veins" are barbs and the fine filaments coming off them are barbules. The distance between the 2 arrows is 0.2mm; 7 barbules in this 0.2mm section.



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NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Sun Dec 07, 2008 11:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Face of a dung fly; same settings as bird feather. Actual width of face (eye to eye) = 1.62mm.
84 frames @0.01mm which took up almost all of a 2GB Compact Flash card.
2nd image is a 800px selection; detail is great but may need to go to 0.05mm frame spacing (=168 frames!)


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NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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augusthouse



Joined: 16 Sep 2006
Posts: 1195
Location: New South Wales Australia

PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 4:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very interesting NU,

Gorgeous tone, colour and clarity in the dung fly. It's luminous! The 'shallow' depth of the stack works beautifully.

Quote:
may need to go to 0.05mm frame spacing


Did you mean 0.005 here? 168 images - it's worth it.

When photographing with the Nikon I tether the DSLR to the PC and utilise the time-lapse feature in Nikon Camera Control Pro 2 allowing approx. 20 secs between shots; so all I have to do is move the positioner and watch each resulting image appear on the PC screen. This method bypasses the CF card and stores the images directly on the hard drive.

The first image - the scan - of the breast feather from a Mourning Dove is superb. The detail is stunning and fascinating. The apparently textured background (intentional or otherwise) gives the image a mixed-media appearence.

Looking at these images alone, with respect of your lighting and arrangement, I would have to place the Schneider Apo-Componon HM 40/2.8 in the outstanding category.

Craig
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 5:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, thanks; of course 0.005mm
The scan was simply laying the feather onto the flatbed and placing a piece of regular white paper on top; thus the texture is that of the paper - pure serendipity.

I would love to get my hands on their newer lens.

A bird's feather may turn out to be a universal subject for comparing the resolution properties of a lens; possibly better and more accessible than the 'standard' moth wing.

Betty's Schneider Xenoplan 1.9/25mm is obviously an excellent lens.
SEE HERE

I'm still using a single flash. Reading all the problems asociated with fiber optics maked me reluctant to make a switch.
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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augusthouse



Joined: 16 Sep 2006
Posts: 1195
Location: New South Wales Australia

PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2009 11:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NU,

If you get a chance, could you post an image of the Schneider Apo-Componon HM 40/2.8?

Craig
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Feb 06, 2009 9:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Craig:
This is a very compact lens, only 29mm long. Top image photographed from "wrong side". The other side of the barrel reads "APO-COMPONON HM 2.8/4.0 MC"
It came with 2 end caps.
Lens should be used in reverse, but no thread on front end.
Bottom image.
A 48 mm ring fits nicely over the actual back of the lens.
A 48-52 ring fits nicely over the front of the lens.
The 48mm female thread accepts the 48mm male thread of the 48-52.
The 52 female thread of the 48-52 accepts the male thread of the Nikon mount.




The whole system forms a solid, no wobble, 'system' allowing the lens to be mounted reversed on the PB-6 bellows.
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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Planapo



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1533
Location: Germany, in the United States of Europe

PostPosted: Fri Feb 06, 2009 10:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gosh! That´s one nifty way of lens mounting, that is! Very Happy

Will try to keep this approach in mind for similar problems.

Thanks for sharing, NU!

--Betty
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augusthouse



Joined: 16 Sep 2006
Posts: 1195
Location: New South Wales Australia

PostPosted: Sat Feb 07, 2009 4:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NU,

Thankyou for uploading the images and the reversal technique.

Craig
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augusthouse



Joined: 16 Sep 2006
Posts: 1195
Location: New South Wales Australia

PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2009 1:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

NU,

In the first image of the lens. The ring marked "Front" is there a thread under there or evidence of a thread?

What is the actual diameter of the lens barrel?

You've indicated that the lens should be used in reverse. Have you taken any images with the lens non-reversed?

Craig
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2009 5:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barrel diam. 45.0mm
Inside diam of that large outside retaining ring 25.0mm
Inner retaining ring has a thread
No images taken with lens non-reversed


_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
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Charles Krebs



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 5805
Location: Issaquah, WA USA

PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2009 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Craig,
Quote:
Have you taken any images with the lens non-reversed?

A few. This is a lens that really should be reverse mounted. (and probably used at 4x and up as well).
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augusthouse



Joined: 16 Sep 2006
Posts: 1195
Location: New South Wales Australia

PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2009 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

NU,

Would you mind if I uploaded some images of a similar, but alternate method of reverse mounting the Schneider Kreuznach Apo Componon HM 40mm f2.8?

Craig
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2009 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Craig: Please do upload your image(s) here; an obvious place for them. Interested to see your solution. Charles has this lens also, wonder how he solved the problem.
_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
augusthouse



Joined: 16 Sep 2006
Posts: 1195
Location: New South Wales Australia

PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2009 12:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



A generic set of extension rings were used because they have less internal structure than the Nikon PK series and accommodate the lens with 1-2mm to spare around its diameter.

Working distance of this particular lens allows sufficient lighting to be applied to the subject without the illumination being obstructed by the setup.

Using this method to mount a lens of shorter focal length could be an issue depending on the lighting method/technique applied.
I reverse mounted a 1.7/17mm Xenoplan (with the addition of a C-mount to Leica 39mm ring). Working distance was limited.
Also used it with the SK 4/28mm; working distance was not an issue. I have some step rings on the way for reverse-mounting the latter.

The Schneider Apo-Componon HM 40/2.8 had particular requirements due to there being no useable threads on the front of the lens for reverse mounting purposes.
I'm curious about what is under that ring on the front of the lens; but I don't have the appropriate tools or sufficient experience to satisfy my curiosity.

Craig

*edit: corrected technical detail
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Last edited by augusthouse on Wed Feb 25, 2009 2:45 pm; edited 1 time in total
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NikonUser



Joined: 04 Sep 2008
Posts: 2567
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

PostPosted: Wed Feb 25, 2009 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Craig:
Your lens looks a lot newer than mine (I recall reading somewhere on this site that the 'beat-up' lenses are better performers than the 'new looking' lenses).

A very elegant mounting you have there.

I unscrewed the large ring on the front; it's simply a lens holder. Looks as though there is one large lens at the front, the one that screws off, and a separate lens at the back that remains with the barrel.

I thought the Optical Spanner Wrench used to unscrew the lens was more interesting than the lens itself, so here it is:

_________________
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
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