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Snow Crystals

 
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Saul



Joined: 31 Jan 2011
Posts: 1510
Location: Naperville, IL USA

PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 9:48 pm    Post subject: Snow Crystals Reply with quote

https://www.nikon.com/about/corporate/museum/events/#snow
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RobertOToole



Joined: 17 Jan 2013
Posts: 1538
Location: United States

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Nikon Museum is always worth a visit. The place is only a 5-10 min walk from the train station and its free. They are constantly updating the museum and adding new industrial technology. I plan to visit there again in February.

Looks like I am going to make the snowflake show but will miss this one:

Special Exhibition “Prototype Lenses — Fascinating Images Captured by the Nikon Z 7 Mirrorless Camera” In this exhibition, Nikon will exhibit approximately 60 prototypes of interchangeable lenses for SLR cameras produced from the 1950’s to the 1980’s.

People should realize that the museum is a wonderful place for any photographer regardless of what brand they shoot, most people say well why would I go to the Nikon Museum when I shoot Canon? I don't own a Nikon Ultra Micro Nikkor lens but I think the technology and history is very interesting.

Robert
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lonepal



Joined: 28 Jan 2017
Posts: 286
Location: Turkey

PostPosted: Wed Dec 19, 2018 11:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/companies/nikon/nikkoresources/RF-Nikkor/Micro_RF/index2.htm

I wish I had one Smile
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20352
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 12:22 am    Post subject: Re: Snow Crystals Reply with quote

Saul wrote:
https://www.nikon.com/about/corporate/museum/events/#snow

Following this link, I found what seemed to be a really helpful handle for finding descriptions of technique (emphasis added):
Quote:
Rokuro Yoshida ... developed the "single light source, dual-color illumination method", which is the standard illumination method for shooting snow crystals in color today.

But to my surprise, when I issued a Google query on the quoted string, I got "No results found" -- not even the nikon.com page! DuckDuckGo did a little better. It did find the nikon.com page, but nothing else.

Does anybody here know a good reference for Yoshida's specific technique?

(Poking around, I found http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/photo2/photo2.htm, which I suspect gives a basis for the answer, but I'd rather see something more specific to Yoshida's work.)

--Rik
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RobertOToole



Joined: 17 Jan 2013
Posts: 1538
Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

At the museum they cover the history of the ultra-micro-nikkors and litho lenses on display in Japan.

This is one from 1960s, 1260 lines per mm. Japan's first microlithograpy lens. The current lenses are 13,000 lines per mm.

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RobertOToole



Joined: 17 Jan 2013
Posts: 1538
Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 12:40 am    Post subject: Re: Snow Crystals Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
Saul wrote:
https://www.nikon.com/about/corporate/museum/events/#snow

Following this link, I found what seemed to be a really helpful handle for finding descriptions of technique (emphasis added):
Quote:
Rokuro Yoshida ... developed the "single light source, dual-color illumination method", which is the standard illumination method for shooting snow crystals in color today.

But to my surprise, when I issued a Google query on the quoted string, I got "No results found" -- not even the nikon.com page! DuckDuckGo did a little better. It did find the nikon.com page, but nothing else.

Does anybody here know a good reference for Yoshida's specific technique?

(Poking around, I found http://www.its.caltech.edu/~atomic/snowcrystals/photo2/photo2.htm, which I suspect gives a basis for the answer, but I'd rather see something more specific to Yoshida's work.)

--Rik


Well if no one figures it out I'll take photos and post a report once I'm back from Japan. Very Happy

Robert
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mawyatt



Joined: 22 Aug 2013
Posts: 2327
Location: Clearwater

PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 9:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

RobertOToole wrote:
At the museum they cover the history of the ultra-micro-nikkors and litho lenses on display in Japan.

This is one from 1960s, 1260 lines per mm. Japan's first microlithograpy lens. The current lenses are 13,000 lines per mm.



Robert,

The setups/lenses used today for semiconductor work may be even better than 13000 lines per mm (~77nm) since chips are being produced with 7nm features. I don't believe Nikon is actually leading in this area anymore, as they were awhile back.

I would love to visit the museum someday, but that's probably not going to happen. Please take a bunch of photos for us, and use your D850 Very Happy

Best,
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RobertOToole



Joined: 17 Jan 2013
Posts: 1538
Location: United States

PostPosted: Thu Dec 20, 2018 10:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mawyatt wrote:


Robert,

The setups/lenses used today for semiconductor work may be even better than 13000 lines per mm (~77nm) since chips are being produced with 7nm features. I don't believe Nikon is actually leading in this area anymore, as they were awhile back.

I would love to visit the museum someday, but that's probably not going to happen. Please take a bunch of photos for us, and use your D850 Very Happy

Best,


Hi Mike,

I'm sure you are right about the resolution, heck I was impressed with the 1200 lpmm.

They have a few big displays on litho technology even a motorized step and repeat set up and a few huge lenses, one is a giant cutaway. Last year they had a display about LED TV panel imaging, they go over the tech behind it with multiple lenses and when you step back they outline the imaging area on the carpet and its huge! They are imaging something like 6 TV panels at once.

Will be sure to post something when I am back in March.

Robert
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