www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - Western Conifer Seed Bug
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Western Conifer Seed Bug

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Olympusman



Joined: 15 Jan 2012
Posts: 3572

PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 1:59 pm    Post subject: Western Conifer Seed Bug Reply with quote

We usually get these invaders in our house at the start of winter. They resemble Assassin Bugs, so I jump on them right away.
Western Conifer Seed Bug Leptoglossus occidentalis


_________________
Michael Reese Much FRMS EMS Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Yawns



Joined: 20 Dec 2015
Posts: 119
Location: Portugal

PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 2:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If that is really a Leptoglossus occidentalis (our "imported" variety is a bit darker) he is a good BUGger ...

came to Portugal in 2010 (from the USA), via Italy ....

the little bastard in less than 3 years reduced our production of pine seed to less than half leaving pine seed farmers with more than 160 million € losses / year...

since the pine seed (only part affected) is very light the damage done is only noticed when the pine cones get broken in the factory ...
_________________
YAWNS _ (Y)et (A)nother (W)onderful (N)ewbie (S)hooting
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Olympusman



Joined: 15 Jan 2012
Posts: 3572

PostPosted: Fri Dec 22, 2017 12:05 pm    Post subject: Bug Reply with quote

The interesting thing about bugs is their diversity even within their own species. A few years ago I captured and photographed a black jumping spider with white spots on its back. I contacted an expert on jumping spiders who was in New Mexico and showed him my specimen. The spots on my specimen were different from the ones he had documented, but he agreed that my species and the ones he had recorded were the same.
Really makes our findings interesting, doesn't it?

Mike
_________________
Michael Reese Much FRMS EMS Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group