Tanzania part XXVIII

Images of undisturbed subjects in their natural environment. All subject types.

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pbertner
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Tanzania part XXVIII

Post by pbertner »

Usambara peacock frog:

Image

Juvenile frog from Usambara mountains:

Image

Juvenile Usambara garter snake portrait (Elapsoidea nigra):

Image

4) Huntsman spider:

Image

5) Ground chameleon (Rieppeleon brevicaudatus):

Image

6) "An angel on your shoulder" - Soft-horned chameleon (Kinyongia tenuis):

Image

7) Liturgusida mantis (Dactylopteryx sp.) portrait:

Image

8 ) Scorpion with prey under UV light with in-flight nematoceran:

Image


Thanks for looking and commenting,
Paul

ChrisR
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Post by ChrisR »

More marvels - thanks for showing us Paul.

pbertner
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Post by pbertner »

Always happy to, thanks Chris.

JTaylor
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Post by JTaylor »

As usual, just spectacular images!
Thanks for sharing.

Ecki
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Post by Ecki »

Wonderful. Thanks for sharing.

iain
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Post by iain »

all excellent images Paul, congratulations on the December admins appreciation, very well deserved

banania
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Post by banania »

Inspiring images, thanks for sharing.

Henri

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Post by RobertOToole »

All excellent images, the fingers of light in one of the chameleon images is a nice touch.

Thanks for posting!

Robert

Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

Very nice. I've also enjoyed your blog. So sorry you had such bad experiences in my adapted country, Ecuador. Sadly, one really does have to be very alert and cautious in the big cities here.

I am fascinated by your UV fluorescence photos here and on your website. They inspired me to search for a 365nm UV light on the web, but the units you recommend on your website appear to be discontinued. Do you have any current recommendation? Preferably of a unit that uses AA batteries (following your wise recommendation to standardize all equipment on this size battery)?

pbertner
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Post by pbertner »

Thanks for the comments everyone, much appreciated!

Lou- Ecuador is still a favourite of mine and I've since learned to be more careful. Undoubtedly part of my ill fortunes have been in part to my naivete while traveling the area. Since then my first couple mishaps I've not had much trouble there.
If you're comfortable with Ebay then you can still find them there. It's one of the more expensive models, by I like the increased power of the 3W (shorter exposure time) and the IPX grade means it's pretty well sealed for the tropics and dropping it in the occasional puddle won't do any harm.

This one is the one I use. http://www.ebay.com/itm/TANK007-Tank-00 ... XQd~5RIRnF

Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

Paul, thanks very much for that link. I will buy one right now. I am very curious about the possibility of fluorescence in orchids, especially those whose flowers imitate arthropods.

I am glad you didn't let your bad experiences spoil the country. It is hard to learn "street smarts", but one does learn with enough exposure to danger, and then one can usually foresee, spot, and avoid problems. Ecuador is a fascinating country and I can't think of many other places in the world with so many undiscovered plant species.

pbertner
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Post by pbertner »

You should research what wavelength most orchids fluoresce at. I haven't noticed too much floral fluorescence at 365nm, so if you're using it for flowers the 395nm wavelength might be better suited to your purposes.

Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

Nothing is known about the fluorescence of the species I work with. That's why it is so interesting to me.

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