Hand sectioning; plants

A forum to ask questions, post setups, and generally discuss anything having to do with photomacrography and photomicroscopy.

Moderators: Pau, rjlittlefield, ChrisR, Chris S.

NikonUser
Posts: 2633
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:03 am
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Hand sectioning; plants

Post by NikonUser »

In this month's Micscape Magazine there is an interesting technique:
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/indexmag.html

I have tried to hand cut sections using several methods, none worked! This method works at almost no cost.
Here is a section of a Hydrangea flower stem. I have only zoological stains which obviously don't work for botanical material :cry: . I have ordered botanical stains. I thought I would draw member's attention to the article while there is still time, for us in the north, to get plant material before winter.
Hopefully better images and interpretation after the stains arrive.
Nikon D7200, 4x CFN, Zerene PMax, flash; stem is 3.24mm wide
hydrangea 29x20.jpg
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives


viktor j nilsson
Posts: 295
Joined: Fri Mar 01, 2013 1:43 am
Location: Lund, Sweden

Re: Hand sectioning; plants

Post by viktor j nilsson »

And for further reference, here's a link to the late Walter Dioni's original article:

http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/artapr04/wdslicera.html

MarkSturtevant
Posts: 1038
Joined: Sat Nov 21, 2015 6:52 pm
Location: Michigan, U.S.A.
Contact:

Re: Hand sectioning; plants

Post by MarkSturtevant »

This 'takes me back'. When I was in gradual school, my research involved doing lots of micro-surgery on various live insects and crustaceans. Legendary among us sorts were 'blue blades', which at the time were regarded as excellent quality. It has been a very very long time, but I suspect these are them: https://www.amazon.com/Silver-Double-Bl ... B0059QF5RS There is discussion in the comments about other brands that are also seen as exceptionally sharp.
Mark Sturtevant
Dept. of Still Waters

NikonUser
Posts: 2633
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:03 am
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Re: Hand sectioning; plants

Post by NikonUser »

The only blades my pharmacy had were Wilkinson Sword, made in Germany. I bought a pack, of 10, $14.00 !!
These are the ones I used.
Still waiting for my stains, from the UK.
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Pau
Site Admin
Posts: 5300
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2010 8:57 am
Location: Valencia, Spain

Re: Hand sectioning; plants

Post by Pau »

Straight scalpel blades are useful for hand cutting, although in most cases too short for use with typical hand microtomes
Swann-Morton #16 may be convenient,
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Swann-Morton ... SwSXFeEO8r

I've used their "Minor Skin Graft Blade No. SG3" with good success with vegetable not too soft tissues
https://www.swann-morton.com/product/33.php
Pau

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic