Tripod for remote outdoor macro?

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descall
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Tripod for remote outdoor macro?

Post by descall »

Hello Forum,

I'd appreciate tripod recommendations for a Lumix G9 + Olympus 60mm macro (total weight = 840g). The tripod needs to be as light as possible because it would be carried in my backpack during long days in the field, often up big hills. Many thanks for any help.

Cheers,
Des
:D

TheDocAUS
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Post by TheDocAUS »


Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

I have a similar kit and similar needs (Oly 60mm, mountaintop species to photograph). I am extremely happy with a Sirui tripod and ball head with a nodal slider. It has legs that extend almost horizontally, a reversible center column (good for ground-level stuff), and the ball head is very useful. The very light ungeared sliding rail is a necessity to quickly get the desired magnification. I'll photograph it tomorrow for you.

dolmadis
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Post by dolmadis »

Lou Jost wrote:The very light ungeared sliding rail is a necessity to quickly get the desired magnification.
I shall be particularly interested in learning from your experience with the rail and especially how smoothly and precisely it can run/traverse and then be fixed quickly in the field.

BR


John

TheDocAUS
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Post by TheDocAUS »

Have a look at the K&F Concept TM2534T tripod as well: https://is.gd/ynMh4b

johan
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Post by johan »

Some things worth mentioning about a macro tripod, you'll want something that can help you shoot very low down to the ground, has a good 'base' (ie stays constant due to weight in a stack), is reasonably quick to set up and I've always found it useful to have something that has a bit more positional flexibility that the standard tripod. I also use it as a base for more that just a camera, ie stacking gear, reflector etc
My extreme-macro.co.uk site, a learning site. Your comments and input there would be gratefully appreciated.

Photomicro
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Re: Tripod for remote outdoor macro?

Post by Photomicro »

descall wrote:Hello Forum,

I'd appreciate tripod recommendations for a Lumix G9 + Olympus 60mm macro (total weight = 840g). The tripod needs to be as light as possible because it would be carried in my backpack during long days in the field, often up big hills. Many thanks for any help.

Cheers,
Des
:D
Hello Des

like many things light weight and stability of tripods is a compromise. Having quite a light camera/lens combination, you don't need something that will withstand a great deal of weight, which means you can utilise a fairly small and compact head. I sometimes think the type of head is as important as the tripod.

I also feel that how I can carry a tripod is as much to do with how easy it seems as much as the absolute weight. A good case can help, and only this week I saw a friends very compact Manfrotto, the type where the legs have a clever mechanism and the central column and head fit with the legs when folded. It had a dedicated case.

I notice that birdwatchers very often have a special ruck-sac type thing , like this;

https://www.cleyspy.co.uk/mulepack.html

These seem very effective, and the set-up is always at the ready, but I suspect that you perhaps won't get all your moss books, bags and lunch in too!

For what it's worth, I still use the Benbo Trekker that I bought in 1987, albeit with a non-original off-centre ball head which gives me a lot of flexibility. For a time I did use one of the (very well made) Chinese clones of a Gitzo, and whilst I liked the lower weight, the round twist leg mechanism and the feel of the carbon fibre, I had to saw off most of the centra column to get it to go low enough for me, and even then didn't think it was as flexible as the Benbo.
regards, Mike.

Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like bananas.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/66189529@N08/

descall
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Post by descall »

Thanks very much for the replies. I've ordered the Sirui T-005X with C-10S ball head. Not sure which slider to opt for yet. Best regards, Des

Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

I have the Sirui T1005x, which is very similar. This is the slider I use with it:

https://www.amazon.com/Desmond-180mm-DN ... B00F1IFZCE

The slider stays on the tripod at all times.

I removed the lower segment of the center column of the Sirui. The short segment could also support a ball head.

Beatsy
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Post by Beatsy »

Oops. I didn't notice you'd already ordered a tripod before I took a couple of snaps. So posting anyway.

I highly recommend the Sunwayfoto T1A20D with their XB-28 ball head. Incredibly stable and robust for it's size and will easily carry a mirrorless with 70-200 f/2.8 telephoto attached! Note: the legs extend to twice the length if needed and have two angles they pull out to (low and high). If the budget runs to it, for macro, their MFR-150S focus rail is great quality too. Ideal for quick stacks in the field at 1:1 or less.

Not the cheapest by any means, but certainly the best I've found to date. It tucks in one end of my small camera bag (despatch style) and takes up hardly any room at all, with only the equivalent weight of a moderate lens.

Image
Image

Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

Beatsy, for myself, I would often need a tripod with longer legs.

Beatsy
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Post by Beatsy »

Lou Jost wrote:Beatsy, for myself, I would often need a tripod with longer legs.
These extend, as I mentioned. But you're right - they ain't very long. A good compromise between size and stability though.
When I need more, I carry a carbon fibre Gitzo traveler instead. Eye watering cost, but I grudgingly admit I got what I paid for.
Image

Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

It does look lightweight and fast to set up.

hero
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Post by hero »

In my experience, tripods tend to get in the way when doing field macro work. Subjects tend to move about in the field, and it is very cumbersome and time-consuming to set up the shot just right, only to discover that the subject has moved some tiny amount that has negated your adjustments.

If stabilization is required, then a setup that allows more flexible and real-time adjustment, while reducing camera shake, is recommended. I recall one prolific macro shooter who goes by "LordV," has an approach that basically amounts to a monopod. He uses a stick (like a broomstick) as a stabilizing point, and holds it against the camera.

There are cases where a tripod and rail will do quite well; e.g., photographing cacti. But field macro work, for me, is almost always handheld and with a flash for lighting.

Beatsy
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Post by Beatsy »

Agreed hero, I only use it for plants (macro), but it's very handy for longer exposure stuff on the same trip (e.g. landscape). Especially when I want to travel light. The rail makes for a handy "nodal mount" for taking panos too.

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