Nikon EFCS seems to work

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ray_parkhurst
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Post by ray_parkhurst »

Chris S. wrote:I can't recall whether or not you are using a StackShot controller. If so, it will easily handle the double shutter-press needed for mirror-up shooting, connecting via the 10-pin port. Meanwhile, you can have your choice of tethering software running through the USB connection. At present, ControlMyNikon's Website says that the D810 will be supported in "the next version"--with no information about when that will be released. All you lose in mirror-up mode is the ability to use the tethering software to actually take the picture. Granted, this is a boneheaded oversight on Nikon's part, and I hope they fix it. That said, it hasn't actually caused me much grief in my tethered workflows. When I'm not using the StackShot controller, I screw in an electronic release.
That's the problem for me...I'm using a Trinamic stepper and Helicon. I rely on all control over USB.
Steve S wrote:As to diff from Canon, wouldn't it come down to second-curtain differences? Might depend on particular Canon shutters. Anyhow differences can't amount to much, second- or third-order effects.
Different Canon models have varying levels of success with their EFSC implementations. It seems to be correlated with the level of noise at beginning of the exposure, or perhaps during pixel quenching. The news that the D810 is completely silent at beginning of exposure is good news and may correlate to good performance at high magnifications.

Steve S
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Post by Steve S »

Chris, I wouldn't be quite so dismissive of Lumo's contentions. His papers look to me like they could survive pretty critical refereeing, the latter an activity I once had a good deal of experience with. Even a very solid tripod still may ring at the micron level when excited by shutter/mirror motion. He says a camera placed on a beanbag is a reasonable simulation of hand holding, and that mirror shock in that situation is less than shutter shock, contrary to the tripod situation. I know it sounds weird, and I surely am not passing it along as established fact, just as a curious and interesting possibility.

I think he got into this in the process of explaining image degradation with Pentax cameras equipped with sensor stabilization, the latter in some cases interacting in an unhappy way with shutter vibrations.

Anyhow, getting back to the D810, I'm reasonably confident that with EFCS there is no mechanical vibration at all until the last ~3ms of the exposure, at the beginning of which interval the second curtain accelerates and thus delivers an opposite impulse to the camera body. (in the center of the field this means the degradation will be during an interval of ~1.5ms.) This is based on Kasson's photographs of an analog scope screen showing a shutter travel time of ~1/400th sec (yes, shorter than the sync speed of 1/250th).

Yousef Alhabshi
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Post by Yousef Alhabshi »

To me.. I was hoping to be able to use the EFCS with the "Delay Mode".. it's a showstopper for me!

Hope Nikon will release a firmware update to enable it with the DM.. i'm skipping the cam for now

Steve S
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Post by Steve S »

Yousef, I didn't fully understand all the intricacies of EFCS when I posted. It is true that selecting EFCS and Delay Mode does not result in an EFCS exposure, but if Mup is selected as well, the combination of all three works in a fairly rational way: the first press of the release immediately raises the mirror, no delay, and then the second press begins the selected delay interval, at the end of which an EFCS exposure is made.

If Mup is selected with EFCS selected, and then the Interval Timer function is programmed, the Interval Timer will make exposures with EFCS. Normally with timer one can select the frame rate for multiple exposures to be made at each interval, but if Mup is chosen, the frame rate is a fixed one frame per second (higher rate settings are overridden). At the beginning of each second interval the mirror cycles, remaining up for ~0.6 to ~0.7 seconds, at the end of which settling time an EFCS exposure is made. In this case there is no double-press required: the whole sequence is initiated by pressing the OK button. You can do EFCS bracketing, etc.

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