are 3d resin printers good for us?

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lothman
Posts: 568
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:00 am
Location: Stuttgart/Germany

are 3d resin printers good for us?

Post by lothman »

Hi everybody,

those days I was looking for a 3D printer having in mind to do the one or other part for photo macrography. I discovered that resin printers like an Elegoo Saturn or Anycubic Photon Mono X became affordable solutions (around 500-600 €) and should be able to produce fine threads like RMS or M42x1 in a way better quality than FDM printers. There are also "tough" resins available. And the working space ist something like 120mmx190mm and 200mm height what should be enough.

Has anybody experience with such parts or could recommend anything? I had some sample parts in hand (comic figures) which showed excellent detail and smooth surfaces, but were a little brittle.

regards
Lothar

Scarodactyl
Posts: 688
Joined: Sat Apr 14, 2018 10:26 am

Re: are 3d resin printers good for us?

Post by Scarodactyl »

Rms and m42 are not really a problem for an fdm printer, though female threads need a little tweaking to compensate for them printing a little tighter than specced. Resin printers do have much finer detail but the amount of post processing and lower overall strength make them a bit less appealing when fdm does just fine.

Saul
Posts: 1732
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:59 am
Location: Naperville, IL USA
Contact:

Re: are 3d resin printers good for us?

Post by Saul »

lothman wrote:
Wed May 12, 2021 3:47 am
Hi everybody,

those days I was looking for a 3D printer having in mind to do the one or other part for photo macrography. I discovered that resin printers like an Elegoo Saturn or Anycubic Photon Mono X became affordable solutions (around 500-600 €) and should be able to produce fine threads like RMS or M42x1 in a way better quality than FDM printers. There are also "tough" resins available. And the working space ist something like 120mmx190mm and 200mm height what should be enough.

Has anybody experience with such parts or could recommend anything? I had some sample parts in hand (comic figures) which showed excellent detail and smooth surfaces, but were a little brittle.

regards
Lothar
My two cents - I'm not using threads for the final product (unless it is prototype or thread will be used once (to keep parts together)).
Combining with metal step rings, inserts, etc.
Saul
μ-stuff

physicsmajor
Posts: 79
Joined: Sun May 10, 2020 12:56 pm

Re: are 3d resin printers good for us?

Post by physicsmajor »

I'm building a Voron V0.1 and am excited to print some adapters - even with its tiny build volume of 120mm^3 you can do an entire adapter for say the 7-element Scanner-Nikkor or the Minolta 5400 from the flange to the scanner lens in one piece. No threading needed, three heat set inserts can hold and center the part.

I'd recommend printing in ABS if possible, that's why I'm building a Voron. ABS doesn't creep (deform under load), but many other easier to print materials do. Last thing you want is a lens slowly drooping off the optical axis! But printing in ABS is not as easy as other materials.

I don't think the resin materials in general are likely to work out well for routinely used high precision parts.

Scarodactyl
Posts: 688
Joined: Sat Apr 14, 2018 10:26 am

Re: are 3d resin printers good for us?

Post by Scarodactyl »

If I understand right PETG and ABS are pretty similar on the deformation front (ie, not a particular issue). PLA is the main offender there.
It's definitely easy to adapt these scanner lenses with 3d printed parts. I printed this sleeve to press fit the lens into the inside (ended up perfect, takes a little pressure to get it in and it holds it tight but not too tight), the right OD to fit into the mount adapter and an M42 thread at the top to accept spacers.
Image
Image
Image
I probably wouldn't use 3d printed threads if they needed to maintain a long-term tensile load, and certainly not with thin walls that might want to shear, but in terms of fit it tends to work great.

soldevilla
Posts: 594
Joined: Thu Dec 16, 2010 2:49 pm
Location: Barcelona, more or less

Re: are 3d resin printers good for us?

Post by soldevilla »

my experience with resin printers is that the surface quality is very good, but the resistance is very low. Threads easily degrade and turn to dust.
I continue to print in PLA, always in 100% infill and many reinforcements, as a commercial design piece. The pieces are very good

lothman
Posts: 568
Joined: Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:00 am
Location: Stuttgart/Germany

Re: are 3d resin printers good for us?

Post by lothman »

soldevilla wrote:
Thu May 13, 2021 4:56 am
my experience with resin printers is that the surface quality is very good, but the resistance is very low. Threads easily degrade and turn to dust.
I continue to print in PLA, always in 100% infill and many reinforcements, as a commercial design piece. The pieces are very good
have you tried some of the so called "tough" resins?

JonyWest
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Mar 26, 2021 2:59 am
Location: USA

Re: are 3d resin printers good for us?

Post by JonyWest »

Thank you for the information, I'm just thinking about buying my own 3-d printer. Your tips about resins will be very useful to me, I understand they will be suitable for printing character models from games. I have a background in 3D modelling in blender, I was thinking of printing them and putting them up for sale and starting my own business that way. I also had the idea of opening my own clothing shop, like other clothing printing companies. I think I, as an artist, could be successful in that.
Last edited by JonyWest on Sun Jun 06, 2021 2:07 am, edited 1 time in total.

Macron
Posts: 28
Joined: Tue Mar 16, 2021 7:02 pm
Location: dallas tx

Re: are 3d resin printers good for us?

Post by Macron »

Man Makes Silencer with 3D Printer https://www.recoilweb.com/man-makes-sil ... 48341.html

i used this
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07WF ... UTF8&psc=1
i let it set to long and could not get the object off the metal plate with a putty knife
and i had to use a hammer about 15 strikes hard as i could to get the object off.

dont forget you can print molds and make that object, i love this slicer app https://www.chitubox.com/en

i resin print this

Image
Image
the resin printer i used (CHEAP) and good https://www.monoprice.com/product?p_id=35435
CAUTION DO NOT take the liquid resin out side in the sun, i had the resin in a clear plastic cup went out side and 10 seconds later before i knew it my leg felt hot
and it burnt a hole threw the cup and was smoking.
UV activates the resin
so all ways leave it in the non see through container you bought it from

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