Water Flea II

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

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RogelioMoreno
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Water Flea II

Post by RogelioMoreno »

Here another set of water flea.

All with plan apo 10x/0.45.

Image
Water Flea by Rogelio Moreno G., on Flickr

Image
Water Flea by Rogelio Moreno G., on Flickr

Image
Water Flea by Rogelio Moreno G., on Flickr


Image
Water Flea by Rogelio Moreno G., on Flickr

Rogelio

Saul
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Post by Saul »

Excellent set Rogelio !

leonardturner
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Post by leonardturner »

All are beautiful images but the first one took my breath away.

Sumguy01
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Post by Sumguy01 »

:D Great pics.
I also think #1 is amazing.
Thanks for sharing.

Jacek
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Post by Jacek »

:shock: :shock: :shock:

arturoag75
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Post by arturoag75 »

:shock: :shock: 3rd is super :wink:

Marek Mis
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Post by Marek Mis »

Rogelio,

Excellent images, as always !

The last one is the best for me.

Marek

Cactusdave
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Post by Cactusdave »

I'm very impressed with your water flea pictures. they really are exquisite on a large monitor. :D I have a couple of queries about your technique. How are you achieving the images of the entire animal? Are these stitches of multiple images with a X10 objective, taken with a lower power objective, or did you simply select smaller individuals for these shots? Also how are you stopping the creatures's movement? When I try to take shots of water fleas I find it necessary to anaesthetise them and be very careful not to crush them with the coverslip. I'd like to know how you managed to get the water flea to pose for the second shot in this series. :shock:
Leitz Ortholux 1, Zeiss standard, Nikon Diaphot inverted, Canon photographic gear

RogelioMoreno
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Post by RogelioMoreno »

Thank you all for your comments!

Rogelio

RogelioMoreno
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Post by RogelioMoreno »

Cactusdave wrote:I'm very impressed with your water flea pictures. they really are exquisite on a large monitor. :D I have a couple of queries about your technique. How are you achieving the images of the entire animal? Are these stitches of multiple images with a X10 objective, taken with a lower power objective, or did you simply select smaller individuals for these shots? Also how are you stopping the creatures's movement? When I try to take shots of water fleas I find it necessary to anaesthetise them and be very careful not to crush them with the coverslip. I'd like to know how you managed to get the water flea to pose for the second shot in this series. :shock:
Dave,

I selected smaller specimen for this shots.

I did not use coverslip (I am using an inverted) in this set to avoid crushing the specimens. The water flea stop movements for some time and I took pictures while it was calm, if it move then I did not change the focus and look for it and put it on the same orientation (on the camera) as I was before and continue taking pictures (if I see that the focus has changed then I start from cero). The water fleas keep calm if you did not disturb (enought water, no coverslip and using neutral density filter to avoid to much light). With pictures 1 and 3 I waited for the water to dry to the point the water flea stopped moving.

After you put the water flea on the coverslip (slide in case you are using an upright microscope) there is enough water and the specimen will pose as pictures 2 and 4, if you are using an inverted you start taking pictures without crushing or disturbing it if you do not cover it.

Rogelio

RogelioMoreno
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Post by RogelioMoreno »

The following are the amount of frame on each stack:

1: 144
2: 89
3: 76
4: 82

All at 2 microns step.

Rogelio

Brian Matsumoto
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Post by Brian Matsumoto »

Rogelio,

I love your entire series. The one that struck me was the last as a ventral view of these creatures is very rarely seen. In addition, the picture is actually quite ominous. It looks to be a hooded alien, staring at the viewer. This is offset by its beautiful colors. A picture well worth studying.


Brian

RogelioMoreno
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Post by RogelioMoreno »

Brian, thank you very much for your words.

Rogelio

carlos.uruguay
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Post by carlos.uruguay »

Artist's work. Thank you for sharing it

Cactusdave
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Post by Cactusdave »

Thanks very much for the detailed information on how you took these superb pictures. So actually these are quite deep stacks on living subjects. :shock: Knowing things like this makes them even more impressive in my opinion. Considering the depth of the stacks and the considerable amount of overlaying detail, the sharpness, clarity and lack of artifacts is truly inspiring.
One other thing, the Nikon X10 planapo you used doesn't seem to have been affected by the lack of a coverslip. Was it designed to work in this way?
Leitz Ortholux 1, Zeiss standard, Nikon Diaphot inverted, Canon photographic gear

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