How i killed my 500D

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

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Fredlab
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How i killed my 500D

Post by Fredlab »

Hello

As biology/geology teacher, I have to show some rocks in different aspects.
Naked eye... episcopy... microscopy.
To identify the minerals we use analyzed thin sections of rock, observed in polarized/analized light.

Example 1 : grand mother of all rocks

Macro of "chondrite" - all planets are made with this kind of rocks (meteorites)
Image

A slide made with this meteorite
Image

When you took a single shot with your microscope (BH2 - SPlan 4x + NFK 2,5x), you obtained a very small part of the slide.
So I decided to increase the shots, several hundred to cover the entire cut.
When all pictures are stitched with AutoPano, the original size is near 100.000 pixels large - toshop and my Mac doesn't work with this kind of size. I reduced to 25/30 %.

Image
(each line - black or white - is 2 mm in reality - this picture @ 7000 pixels - HERE)

Another way to see this work with Zoomify
http://www.macromicrophoto.fr/petrograp ... drite.html

Another examples, next posts.
I apologise for my poor english
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Charles Krebs
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Post by Charles Krebs »

That's a lot of work, but the result is quite impressive!

Fredlab
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Post by Fredlab »

oops, a message from the great Charles
:oops: 8)
Thank you.

I would show more pictures, but I spent my summer shooting forty slides.
Because I could not find a satisfactory solution with cameras, I opted for shooting with an SLR.
While reading your article on the Canon and EFSC I am determined to buy a 500D (I use Nikon boxes for over 25 years - I can confirm when we exceed a certain magnification, they vibrate really too )
So I took tens of thousands of photos from the LiveView.
There are two noise.
The first should be the movement of the second curtain.
The second should be the mirror is raised and the first curtain rises. Gradually, the second noise is elongated and the case began to sound like a little pig.
One day, it no longer wanted to continue the adventure, following a second noise, longer than usual...
The 500D is still running in "normal" mode.
I use it on my bench stacking, for shooting with flash.
Now a 550D replaces ... but again, I feel it will end with the same problem.
Do you think that Sony Nex 5 or 7N may have greater longevity ?
(i have a Nikon One J1, with a real electronic shutter, but i have many difficults to put it on my BH2 - sensor is small and I have not yet found a weak (1x) projective good enough)
I apologise for my poor english
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Charles Krebs
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Post by Charles Krebs »

Do you think that Sony Nex 5 or 7N may have greater longevity ?
:smt102

Cactusdave
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Re: How i killed my 500D

Post by Cactusdave »

Fredlab wrote:

When all pictures are stitched with AutoPano, the original size is near 100.000 pixels large - toshop and my Mac doesn't work with this kind of size. I reduced to 25/30 %.
I have experienced a similar problem with Photoshop Elements 11 refusing to open large stitched panoramas. The size limit seems to be around 380Mb for tiff images, with Photoshop reporting a wrong file type error for larger tiffs and a cannot parse error in the case of equivalent pixel sized jpegs. I don't know whether this is a software limitation or a memory issue. However the standard Windows 7 photoviewer opens these files OK, though it takes its time on my 4GB RAM machine. I would be interested to know what software you used to open your very large images that enabled you to at least resize (and crop?) them. I have resorted to batch resizing the individual images to smaller pixel dimensions, but that defeats the object of creating high resolution images in the first place
Leitz Ortholux 1, Zeiss standard, Nikon Diaphot inverted, Canon photographic gear

Fredlab
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Post by Fredlab »

For this panorama, i took 900 pictures

Image

It's possible to save (at ?) ".psb" format without resizing the panorama, but the weight of the file is shocking (200 Go or more...).

After stitching, i ask to Autopano to save the panorama at 25% - Photoshop CS accepts pictures under 30.000 pixels large.

I have another constraint. My version of Zoomify Converter doesn't accept pictures over 256 Mpx.
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Jacek
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Post by Jacek »

wow, well done

Fredlab
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Post by Fredlab »

Thanks for your com'.

I said that chondrite is grand-mother of all rocks.
After collapsing of many, many, many meteorites, 4,5 billions years ago, different atoms are rearranged so that the Earth was a ball of magma.
The lightest elements formed atmosphere, hydrosphere, heavier gave a core (Fe, Ni) and a layer of silicates, 2900 km thick... the mantle.

In mantle, we find the mother of all rocks of the earth's surface.

Example 2 : an heart of peridotite

Macro shot of a peridotite's core in basalt
Image

After 1/2 day of work.
Image
(7000 pixels large - HERE)

With zoomify -> link

I'd like to continue to tell the story of the Earth, but my English is really too weak.
I'll post some other views still, if you're interested.
I apologise for my poor english
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Pau
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Post by Pau »

Nice work Fredlab. I also love petrographic sections, and in special peridotites.

Do you have facilities to make your own thin sections?
Pau

Fredlab
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Post by Fredlab »

Pau wrote:Nice work Fredlab. I also love petrographic sections, and in special peridotites.
Thanks...
you'll see another slides of peridotites later
Pau wrote:Do you have facilities to make your own thin sections?
Yes.
First, I bought many slides in ebay.
I used slides from my lycee.
I have an address of "lithopreparateur" who works near my job. I gave him some rocks... 15 euros for one slide.
I apologise for my poor english
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Fredlab
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Post by Fredlab »

Hello

After seeing the two most important rocks for Earth, I will show you some other rocks of the Earth's crust.
Normally, the mantle (2900 km thick - consists of peridotite) is completely solid.
At some point, the peridotite may partially melt. The result is a basaltic magma.
When the magma reaches the surface, it cools quickly and the crystals do not have much time to train. This results in a microlithic rock, basalt.

Image

To see a little more detail, I invite you to visit this page and use the "zoomify" function.

If magma is trapped deep, then it will crystallize slowly. We obtain a granular rock, gabbro

Image
(you can compare sizes of minerals - black or white lines are 2 mm in both view)

If you want dive in the view, follow this link

Basalt and gabbro are the two rocks of oceanic crust.

(another views of gabbro : HERE and HERE)

(If you read French easily, maybe this thread will interest you (I'm only at the beginning of the geological history of the Earth)
I apologise for my poor english
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Fredlab
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Post by Fredlab »

Hello

If you want to see another panoramic shots in petrological slides, follow this link : http://www.macromicrophoto.fr/petrography/index.html

56 slides
In a few weeks, I would propose a "V2" with pages dedicated to minerals (videos with extinctions)
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carlos.uruguay
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Post by carlos.uruguay »

Thank you for all this interesting information

soldevilla
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Post by soldevilla »

Impressive work! I link it to my geologist friends.

JL
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Post by JL »

Hello everybody. It has been so long ago since I have actively participated in the forum that my original ID was eliminated from the user list, anyway.

Fred, I came through the same problem when trying to photograph thin sections. The microscope objectives allow only for such a reduced field of view that I could not get a good representation of the rock texture/fabric. In my case, due to the poor optics of my china made microscope, I could not opt for your solution of photo mosaicing the sample.

Finally I found a simple solution using three slide mounts. Two of them would be fitted with a piece of polarizing film, while the other would be used for carrying the thin section. When properly mounted, the sample can be lighted from the back, and a picture taken from the front side by using a camera fitted with a macro or closeup lens.

Image


As an example, this is a picture of an Olivine crystal under the microscope using a 4X lens

Image


This is a view of the thin section (on the above mentioned adapter) using a Tamron 60mm macro.

Image

This method does not allow for the detail of your mosaics, but it is a lot more faster, just depend on which use we want to make of the photo. Now I just have to find somebody that could make thin sections of the quality that you show.

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