a "What Is It?" (too easy I think!)

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

Moderators: rjlittlefield, ChrisR, Chris S., Pau

Charles Krebs
Posts: 5865
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:02 pm
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
Contact:

a "What Is It?" (too easy I think!)

Post by Charles Krebs »

Nikon MM-11 microscope, Olympus 50/0.50 LMPlanFL N , Olympus TLU tube lens, 50X on sensor, Canon T3i
Image

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 22450
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Post by rjlittlefield »


rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 22450
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Post by rjlittlefield »

By the way, this strikes me as astonishingly clean for 50X on sensor. If it weren't for the scale bar and the description, I would have no idea how small this subject is.

Very nice in all respects.

I'd ask for a stereo, but with this illumination and posing, I suspect the 3D wouldn't add much!

--Rik

Charles Krebs
Posts: 5865
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:02 pm
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
Contact:

Post by Charles Krebs »

Yes that's it of course. I had actually forgotten about the post you referenced... remembered two older ones...
http://www.photomacrography1.net/forum/ ... php?t=1997
http://www.photomacrography1.net/forum/ ... php?t=2003
... but I figured after 7 years it might stump someone :wink:

The 50/0.50 is a new one for me. I was a little leery of using it because the NA is pretty modest for a 50X (well into diffraction territory) but the 10.6mm working distance is decent. I'm piecing together a scope for this type of subject and I'm using an Olympus tube lenses and a some of their objectives (and a 5X and 10X Mitutoyo). The new Olympus UIS2 FL (fluorite) objectives look quite good.

Mitch640
Posts: 2137
Joined: Sun Aug 15, 2010 1:43 pm

Post by Mitch640 »

Well, it stumped me. :)

I love what stacking does to the chitin, it looks like amber, or tortoise shell.

Charles Krebs
Posts: 5865
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:02 pm
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
Contact:

Post by Charles Krebs »

I suppose I should describe what this is here, rather than just providing older links...

This is the top of the tarsus on a rear leg of a honeybee (at the joint where it meets the tibia... the large joint in the honeybee's rear leg). The area where these leg segments meet is known as the "pollen press" or "pollen packer". Pollen is moved into this area via stiff hairs or "combs" on the bees legs, and when these two rear leg segments are "flexed" the pollen is compressed (like a "nutcracker" action). It is then moved and collected on the outer surface of the tibia... the "pollen basket".

I tried to clear out all pollen so the interesting structure would be visible, but you can still see a few blackberry pollen grains.

pierre
Posts: 276
Joined: Mon Jan 04, 2010 12:37 pm
Location: France, Var, Toulon

Post by pierre »

Rik already sums up all my thoughts :)
Pro level as always Charles :shock:

Respect.
Regards

Pierre

curt0909
Posts: 609
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2011 10:06 am
Location: Pittsburgh, PA

Post by curt0909 »

Its rare to see an image at this magnification with this contrast and detail.

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic