Blow Fly spiracle (anterior) + hind spiracle

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

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NikonUser
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Blow Fly spiracle (anterior) + hind spiracle

Post by NikonUser »

Compare with beetle spiracle
HERE
Image
NU11122
Last edited by NikonUser on Tue Oct 11, 2011 8:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Very nice! I was hoping you'd post this as an image thread, after you showed us a little preview over in one of the technical threads.

--Rik

RogelioMoreno
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Post by RogelioMoreno »

Very nice!

Rogelio

Mitch640
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Post by Mitch640 »

Amazing. Just out of curiosity, how many people can do this kind of work? It would seem to be rare ability.

NikonUser
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Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Post by NikonUser »

Thanks guys.
Mitch - what can I say, I'm likely the only person in the universe that can do such work. In actual fact it's one of the easiest preps to make. Simply soak an insect overnight in 5% KOH, isolate a piece of cuticle that has a spiracle, wash in water, mount in glycerine. Q.E.D.
Most insects have 2 spiracles on each segment.
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Mitch640
Posts: 2137
Joined: Sun Aug 15, 2010 1:43 pm

Post by Mitch640 »

LOL, easy for you. Is this something that is taught in Entomology 101? OK, I can see maybe a bee tongue, but a blow fly nostril? It gives new meaning to the words nit picking. I would build a shrine to anyone who could do that, if I knew what direction to face it in. :)

Believe me, I am impressed.

ChrisRaper
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Post by ChrisRaper »

Man alive ... that's incredible work - really well done! :D

Do you have any photos of the hind thoracic spiracle on tachinids? I have been musing on the idea of taking photos of a few key species to show their differences but the mag needed is way above what I can generate at the moment.

Harold Gough
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Post by Harold Gough »

Impressive detail and great composition.

Harold
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

NikonUser
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Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Post by NikonUser »

Thanks Harold & Chris.

Chris: I don't have any prepared slides for tachinids (have some for calliphorids) but it would be a simple process to make some. However, I guess for ID purposes most collectors would not want to sacrifice a specimen for KOH-digestion. They need to see the spiracle in a pinned specimen. That's a real challenge; you know where they hide that hind thoracic spiracle.
I had a try with an Archytas sp. (largish species); really needed a 20x objective on bellows but the working distance and shallow depth of field were too fiddly. Ended up using a 4x objective on long bellows extension.
Not sure that it would be possible to get a decent similar shot with smaller tachinids; but using KOH-digested material would be easy.

For the non-dipterists: the blow fly spiracle is of the anterior thoracic spiracle and always seems to be slit-like in flies. The hind spiracle is at the back of the thorax and is partially hidden by the abdomen, and bits and pieces on the thorax.
It is somewhat rounded and has a flap or valve. The yellow and white dots in the image are pollen grains.


Image
NU11124
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

ChrisRaper
Posts: 291
Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2011 1:40 am
Location: Reading, UK
Contact:

Post by ChrisRaper »

Nice shot ... I think you're right in that the photo would have to be of the spiracle in-situ, on the fly, otherwise the three-dimensional effect of the flaps would be lost. Most of the tachinids have the spiracle shape on your photo (with a single flap) but others have paired flaps and others can have a fringe with a hole at the top ... all fascinating and overlooked in some keys. :)

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