Encysted Nassula

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

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jc maccagno
Posts: 509
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 5:43 pm

Encysted Nassula

Post by jc maccagno »

Freshwater 40X,50X 100X objectives

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bromodomain
Posts: 156
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 11:50 am

Post by bromodomain »

What is that structure with the arrow pointing towards it?

jc maccagno
Posts: 509
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 5:43 pm

encysted Nassula

Post by jc maccagno »

Hello

The arrow is pointing to the mouth which is supported by internally stiff rods (basket or cyrtos). This is retained in the cystic form.

Thanks for looking

John

René
Posts: 467
Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2006 4:22 am

Post by René »

Remarkable!

Thanks for showing, René

Mitch640
Posts: 2137
Joined: Sun Aug 15, 2010 1:43 pm

Post by Mitch640 »

Excellent find. Do you know what made them encyst?

RogelioMoreno
Posts: 2962
Joined: Fri Nov 20, 2009 11:24 am
Location: Panama

Post by RogelioMoreno »

Hi,

Very nice!

The mouth looks like one that I found some time ago:
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/v ... ht=nassula


Rogelio

jc maccagno
Posts: 509
Joined: Tue Dec 21, 2010 5:43 pm

encysted nassula

Post by jc maccagno »

Hello Mitch

Initially this water sample was rich in cyanobacteria including Ocillatoria and Spirulina and other smaller algae. Many Nassula were present in the initial sample. As the population of Ocillatoria and algae declined, so did the Nassula numbers. Eventually,( about 10 days later ) the cysts appeared. I assume that the triggering factor was a shortage of food.
From what I have read this seems to be the case.
Apparently adding cyanobacteria enriched water to this sample would cause the cysts to return to their ciliate form. Incidently the water sample still contained considerable Spirulina so perhaps it is not a food source for this ciliate.

Hope that this answers your question.

John

Mitch640
Posts: 2137
Joined: Sun Aug 15, 2010 1:43 pm

Post by Mitch640 »

Thanks John. It goes a long way toward my understanding of Nassula in particular and amoeba in general. I had noticed that when my jars or aquarium started aging and the water would either lose it's oxygen or some other change happened, the amoeba of all kinds, especially the testate, would just disappear. I knew there was some trigger, but not what. A lack of food would account for it also, and now that you mention it, cyanobacteria would also be gone. I thought it was lack of oxygen or maybe increase of nitrates. I have not found cysts though.

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