Dead and live amoeboids

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

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NikonUser
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Dead and live amoeboids

Post by NikonUser »

EDIT: was "Unknown, ID help please"
In my freshwater sample. Moved faster than Amoeba on same slide but much slower than ciliates on same slide.
Appeared to be a sphere with a hollow center; surface bumpy but vacuoles present; did not see any vacuoles contracting.
Oly 40x S Plan + 1.25x intermediate lens+ 2.5x relay lens, DIC; single frames.
Image

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NU11031 NU11032 NU11033.
Last edited by NikonUser on Mon Mar 21, 2011 5:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

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Olympus microscope and objectives

Mitch640
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Post by Mitch640 »

That's almost un-naturally round. I'll be curious to hear what it is.

Ferry
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Post by Ferry »

It looks like a dieing amoeba, rounded up, but it is strange that it is moving!? Did you notice any cilia of flagella? Or maybe a membranous shell?

Mitch640
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Post by Mitch640 »

Ferry, what does "rounded up" mean. Or what could cause that?

Ferry
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Post by Ferry »

Sorry, I mean: spherical, like a ball. If an amoeba is dead, water penetrates the cell and it gets round.

Mitch640
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Post by Mitch640 »

Ah, that makes sense. The first thing I noticed here was how perfectly round it was. That's just not natural.

NikonUser
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Post by NikonUser »

Hi Ferry,
Yours sounds like an accurate ID/description.
No cilia, no flagella, no membranous shell.
The slide mount was deep, i.e., cover glass was not squashing anything. Possible (likely?) that this ball was simply drifting in the water.
The granular structure does look a lot similar to a live amoeboid on the same slide.
Same microscope setup; single frames.
Image
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Ferry
Posts: 301
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 2:41 pm
Location: Netherlands
Contact:

Post by Ferry »

These are pictures of Mayorella spec. Notice the paired crystals, which are typical for some species like Mayorella bigemma (bi-gemma = two stones)! The crystals are hour-glass-shaped and attached to spherical bodies. The right picture shows the nucleus very clearly, just right of the green algae.

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