Trachelomonas. Polyarthra rotifer.

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

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Charles Krebs
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Trachelomonas. Polyarthra rotifer.

Post by Charles Krebs »

Finally took a fresh pond sample this afternoon. Lots of trachelomonas and some rotifers I have not seen too often. (Sorry, no ID).
Rotifer with 40X objective, trachelomonas with 100X objective.

Image


Image

...edited to add rotifer identification.... Thanks Francisco.
Last edited by Charles Krebs on Mon Dec 06, 2010 11:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

fpelectronica
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Location: España

Post by fpelectronica »

Hello
Beautiful photographs
I think it would Poyartha rotifer
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJOqAcDbGHg
Greetings
Francisco

Mitch640
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Post by Mitch640 »

The detail is amazing. I thought you had added an insert in the first one, but I guess that's just in the field of view. :)

Marek Mis
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Post by Marek Mis »

Charles,
both your images are simply beautiful. The details are amazing.
Regards
Marek
Suwalki, Poland

Charles Krebs
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Post by Charles Krebs »

Francisco,

Yes, it does appear to be a Polyarthra, thank for the identification.

It's motion was interesting. In addition to the normal "cruising" motion observed in many rotifers as they feed, these would occasionally make an extremely rapid "jump" for a short distance. I couldn't make out what the mechanism was that enabled that extremely quick locomotion.

Bernd
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Post by Bernd »

Dear Charles,

incredible photos indeed!

The Polyarthra rotifer has 12 paddel like appendages, in 4 groups of 3. Two of these groups are parallel to the left and right side of the rotifer´s body, stretching beyond its back end. These paddles can be flipped back and forth by nearly 180°, powered by the huge muscles which can be clearly seen behind the paddles. When the paddles are flipped the rotifer makes a big jump, most likely to escape predators.

By the way: How did you manage to photograph so many Trachelomonas specimen so close to each other with that detail without cracking a single lorica? Unbelievable.

Greetings
Bernd

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