Saccamoeba - 2nd image added

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NikonUser
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Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:03 am
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Saccamoeba - 2nd image added

Post by NikonUser »

This was new to me.
I am familiar with the 'standard' Amoeba which glide forward with several pseudopodia. Also familiar with the Testate Amoeba which construct tiny houses.
This is a Saccamoeba described as "a monopodial naked free-living amoeba with a lobose pseudopodium, usually progressing as a single pseudopodium".

The front end is to the right and it retains this shape, single pseudopodium (monopodial), as it moves. The spiky rear end (cilia? spines?) appears to be common in this genus and helps separate them from Amoeba spp.

Length: reasonably constant, measured here as 99.5µ.
Image would have benefited from using a 60x objective (but it wasn't mounted)

Olympus BHS DIC, 40x S Plan, 1.25x intermediate lens, 2.5x NFK relay lens.
Image
NUM10116
Last edited by NikonUser on Fri Dec 03, 2010 10:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

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Olympus microscope and objectives

john sp.
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Post by john sp. »

I believe that feature on the backend of amoeba is referred to as the uroid area, and its presence and form can help in distinguishing different sorts of amoeba. I think in this case, the form would be described as villi.

Nice capture of this type of amoeba and its distinguishing features.

John

NikonUser
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Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:03 am
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Post by NikonUser »

Thanks John.
It seems that distention of the uroid by a large CV is characteristic for this genus, image attached.
Image
NUM10117
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Mitch640
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Joined: Sun Aug 15, 2010 1:43 pm

Post by Mitch640 »

I always love looiking at DIC images and the detail they show. I keep seeing faces in most of them though. :)

Charles Krebs
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Post by Charles Krebs »

NU,

Nice find. Been some time since I've seen an amoeba like this.

Ferry
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Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 2:41 pm
Location: Netherlands
Contact:

Post by Ferry »

Nice photograph of a Saccamoeba. Species distinction is very difficult. Important characteristics are the shape of the nucleus, cystforming, the shape and the number of crystalls, the Lenght/Broad ratio, presence of endocytic bacteria and some you can only see with an Electron Microscope.
I know, that is very frustrating, but nevertheless you can have a lot of fun with amoebae. I still have for over 30 years now :D

Ferry

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