Rotifer in Brightfield & Phase Contrast

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

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NikonUser
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Rotifer in Brightfield & Phase Contrast

Post by NikonUser »

Possibly a Collotheca sp.
Body length, to base of tail, 0.3 mm; flash
Olympus 40x S Plan Apo in brightfield
Olympus 40x S Plan in PC
both with 2.5x NFK projection eyepiece.
Image
Image
NUM10084 NUM10085
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Charles Krebs
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Post by Charles Krebs »

Nice! Collotheca of some type for sure. Remarkable little creatures.

Mitch640
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Post by Mitch640 »

Very nice images. Rotifers seem to come in a wide variety of body shapes and sizes. Are those it's cilia?

NikonUser
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Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Post by NikonUser »

Thanks Charles and Mitch.
Mitch: I think those long spines are setae that perhaps help direct the food; the cilia would be much shorter and just visible between the 'peaks'.
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Charles Krebs
Posts: 5865
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:02 pm
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
Contact:

Post by Charles Krebs »

NU,

I'm not really sure what the proper nomenclature is for the long radiating structures. I've seen them referred to as "setae" as well as (perhaps more frequently) cilia. They are not really stiff, just extended very straight and motionless while "hunting". On contact with potential food they can show extreme whip-like flexibility and mobility (also seen when the creature "pulls in" when it feels threatened).

It's amazing how "independently" they can operate. When observed you can often see just a few "whip" inwardly when a small particle comes into contact, apparently to get it into position to be ingested.

Perhaps Michel (aka "Verolet") or another rotifer "specialist" could provide a more definitive answer.

(Probably acceptable either way, I just think of setae as stiff bristles)

verolet
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Location: France

Post by verolet »

Hi
I think that it is possible to use setae or cilia.
To see the use of these setae you can see
a video of a Collothaca ornata
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x52ty7 ... es_animals

and one of a Collotheca stephanochaeta where the setae look like those of Stephanoceros fimbriatus

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84oJOMYQWBM

Mitch640
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Joined: Sun Aug 15, 2010 1:43 pm

Post by Mitch640 »

That first video is pretty impressive. Aside from the quality, that Stentor seemed to be using a lure, like a scent, to draw the bugs into the mouth area.

arturoag75
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Post by arturoag75 »

Very good pics and awasome video of "happy meal"!
best
arturo

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