A Bulbochaete alga

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

Moderators: rjlittlefield, ChrisR, Chris S., Pau

NikonUser
Posts: 2693
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:03 am
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

A Bulbochaete alga

Post by NikonUser »

EDIT: was "Alga ID appreciated"
From a local lake outlet,
10x, 20x, and 40x Olympus objectives; all with NFK 2.5x photoeyepiece. ZS PMax stacks
Image
Image
NUM10023 NUM 10024
Last edited by NikonUser on Sun Aug 29, 2010 11:42 am, edited 2 times in total.
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

rekuwi
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:22 am
Location: Wiesbaden, Deutschland

Post by rekuwi »

Hallo NU,

may be Bulbochaete (mirabilis)
(Kosmos Naturführer: Das Leben im Wassertropfen von Heinz Streble/Dieter Krauter, Page 191)

greetings
Regi

Will Milne
Posts: 82
Joined: Tue Sep 23, 2008 4:47 pm
Location: Manitoba Canada
Contact:

Post by Will Milne »

Hi NU

I've always enjoyed your work both non scope and the new scope adventures. Have no idea on an ID :) but was curious if you have done any imaging with your new scope using nikon cf's and direct projection versus oly objectives and the photoeyepiece ? Nice images.

Will

NikonUser
Posts: 2693
Joined: Thu Sep 04, 2008 2:03 am
Location: southern New Brunswick, Canada

Post by NikonUser »

Thanks for the ID Regi. I'm sure you are correct.
Found this on the WWW
"This branched, filamentous green alga is named for its distinctive, colorless hair cells with bulbous bases. The filaments have more than six cells, are unilaterally branched in a single plane, and lack mucilage. The cells are broader at their upper end and each have a parietal, net-like chloroplast with several pyrenoids."
REF HERE.

I wish I had paid more attention to those Hair Cells.

Thanks Will.
No, I haven't used the Nikon CFs on the scope. I have only a 4x, 10x, and 40x (E). Although all 3 were designed for transmitted light and a cover glass the 4x and 10x work well with reflected light and no c/g.
I can't see any advantage of using the 4x and 10x on the BHS, - don't I get the same result by using them on bellows? Is there an advantage?
It may be worth checking the 40x on the BHS with direct projection. The BHS does have a nice substage condenser. Up until now I have used the Nikon 40x on my modified Oly BHM base, no condenser and flash beneath the stage.
NU.
student of entomology
Quote – Holmes on ‘Entomology’
” I suppose you are an entomologist ? “
” Not quite so ambitious as that, sir. I should like to put my eyes on the individual entitled to that name.
No man can be truly called an entomologist,
sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp.”
Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr
The Poet at the Breakfast Table.

Nikon camera, lenses and objectives
Olympus microscope and objectives

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic