Raphidiophrys and rotifers

Images made through a microscope. All subject types.

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Charles Krebs
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Raphidiophrys and rotifers

Post by Charles Krebs »

I have a small fish tank I keep outside that eventually gets the remainder of some of my pond samples after I'm finished working with them. This then becomes it's own source of subject matter over time. Here are a few inhabitants from a recent "eyedropper".

The last shot is not as crisp as I would like, but when the subject is relatively deep in a wet mount that's what happens with a 100X objective. However I really liked the way it portrays the "frenzied" activity going on... from the coronal cilia to the cilia along the buccal funnel headed toward the trophi.

Olympus BHS, 60/1.40 S Plan Apo, 1.67 NFK photoeyepiece, DIC illumination, Canon DSLR, Electronic flash.
Image

Image

Olympus BHS, 100/1.40 S Plan Apo, 1.67 NFK photoeyepiece, DIC illumination, Canon DSLR, Electronic flash.
Image

discomorphella
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Joined: Sun Oct 01, 2006 7:26 pm
Location: NW USA

Post by discomorphella »

Hi Charlie--

I really like the Raphidiophrys (ok, I like them all...but the Raphidiophrys is my favorite). You really captured the little flowing bits of axoplasm (??) well. I can watch those for what seems like hours (hopefully its a bit shorter than that). Its too bad they don't make a 60/1.4 or 100X/1.4 with a correction collar for those of us who want to look at things in water under a cover glass. I've only seen one objective like that...and it was of course designed for semiconductors not pond life. That and the fact that it costs as much as a small house...

David

Tom Jones
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Post by Tom Jones »

Very, very nice!!

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