MYXOMYCETES X - The Story of Stemonitis axifera

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Walter Piorkowski
Posts: 693
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2006 6:42 pm
Location: South Beloit, Ill

MYXOMYCETES X - The Story of Stemonitis axifera

Post by Walter Piorkowski »

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Very early stage of sporangia formation.(Left) A later stage before drying out. (Right)

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Studio shot of fully ripened mature sporangia. Total hight approx.9mm.

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Sorry too late to collect spore and net samples. Try again next year.

Olympus C-2000-Z with E3500 closeup lens
Canon Pro90IS with E3500 closeup lens

Just when you folks are probably getting sick to death of myxomycete images I would like to introduce you to my most favorite and best studied myxo. All the above images are the same species although not the same subject captured over many years.To aid you in finding it for yourselves next year I offer a life and decay cycle. The rare red subject is a real treat. The studio shot at center is my first indoor shot using a new macrostage designed for the purpose.

Walt

Ken Ramos
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Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:12 pm
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

Post by Ken Ramos »

Excellent images. :D The first composite shows a stage(s) that I have never observed but would definitly like to and to photograph. S. axifera is most common in my area and not really all that hard to find for the beginning myxo hunter, since they are quite large and they are a good source for studying the beetles which feed on myxos. Thanks Walt, great myxo shots. :D

beetleman
Posts: 3578
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:19 am
Location: Southern New Hampshire USA

Post by beetleman »

Remarkable photos Walter. It is hard to believe that they are the same creatures. I find it very interesting to see a full life cycle of something. Don`t worry, I will never get bored of your pictures. :wink:
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
Doug Breda

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
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Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Walt, these are great pictures! I really like the combination of field shots for life cycle and a studio shot to catch the eye and show off the structure.

So you have a "new macrostage", eh? Any plans to show us that piece of equipment?

--Rik

Walter Piorkowski
Posts: 693
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2006 6:42 pm
Location: South Beloit, Ill

Post by Walter Piorkowski »

Thank you Ken, Doug and Rik for the kind words. Maybe I can be a graphic designer some day! And Rik if you really want to see my Macro stage I have two shots here for you.
Image

Image

Less I be accused of have to many knobs, every thing here has a function. The subject stage can be rotated, raised or lowered, tilted forward and back as well as right to left. It can also be moved straight forward and back and left and right. The back drop position is adjustable as is the lighting tent.

The camera also has left and right movement and two forward and back racks to provide extended range plus a dial indicated close up rack. It also has tilt and rotation. The lamp or strob stands are full adustable and part of the assembly.

The whole contraption is designed to be set up in the field on a tripod.
Yes I am a mad scientist and proud of it.

Walt

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
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Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Excellent -- I like knobs! The dial indicator on the rack is a neat idea, great combination of portability and precision for field work.

--Rik

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