more silica - with a difference!!

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crocoite
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more silica - with a difference!!

Post by crocoite »

You've had the hyalite and precious opal, both a form of silica, and both of which form under relatively low temperatures...

...now for something a little different. This is a photo of a 'fulgarite' - fused sand where it has been struck by lightning, location Evan's Head, New South Wales (my son's name is Evan. Hope it never hits him in the head).

The first image shows it side on and it is about 3cm long. The second shows the tube where the lightning bolt hit and fused the sand. This image about 9mm across.

Now, who's for a round of golf this nice sultry day :twisted:


It is said that lightning strikes the earth around 100 times per second (obviously not all in the one location!)...and around 3,000 people are struck each year.
Last edited by crocoite on Sat Feb 17, 2007 7:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

I've heard of this, but not seen pictures before. Very interesting!

Does the tubular opening go all the way through the length of the formation?

--Rik

beetleman
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Post by beetleman »

Hi Steve, we have had fulgarite for sale at the store here. very interesting stuff once you know the story behind it. very nice pictures. I should take pictures of our Coprolites :wink:
Last edited by beetleman on Tue Oct 10, 2006 3:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
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Cyclops
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Post by Cyclops »

Very neat!
They say lightning never srikes twice, yet it always strikes twice!

crocoite
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Post by crocoite »

rjlittlefield wrote:Does the tubular opening go all the way through the length of the formation?--Rik
Hi Rik. Yes it does. This is only a small section. It's interesting to see the tube spiralling down too.

crocoite
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Post by crocoite »

beetleman wrote:I should take pictures of our Coprplites :wink:
The collection that I recently acquired has some coprolites in it from Nundle in New South Wales. Unfortunately they are a bit boring. Great story behind them, but they are just brown 'lumps'...of rock :lol:

crocoite
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Post by crocoite »

Cyclops wrote:Very neat!
They say lightning never srikes twice, yet it always strikes twice!
In fact, it can strike the same place many, many times.

Ken Ramos
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Post by Ken Ramos »

A pretty interesting subject there Steve. I wonder, just wondering now, what fused sand from a nuclear blast may look like? :-k

crocoite
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Post by crocoite »

Ken Ramos wrote:A pretty interesting subject there Steve. I wonder, just wondering now, what fused sand from a nuclear blast may look like? :-k
I have a piece from the original blast. It's called "trinityite". I'll see if I can dig it out and photograph for you.

Ken Ramos
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Post by Ken Ramos »

From the first test at New Mexico? I just love split atoms :D

crocoite
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Post by crocoite »

Ken Ramos wrote:From the first test at New Mexico? I just love split atoms :D
Absolutely!

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