Frost Crystals On A Pitcher Plant

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beetleman
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Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:19 am
Location: Southern New Hampshire USA

Frost Crystals On A Pitcher Plant

Post by beetleman »

From November 2007. This is a Purple Pitcher Plant-Sarracenia purpurea in my bog garden. They are native to New Hampshire.

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Doug Breda

Ken Ramos
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Post by Ken Ramos »

Pretty nice there Doug. :D I am going to ask a question that probably has an obvious answer but, it that its winter color and does it lighten up in spring to another? The reason being is that the "cut-leaf grape fern" is a deep green during the warmer seasons and turns a deep bronze during the winter. So I was wondering if this plant did the same. :D

beetleman
Posts: 3578
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:19 am
Location: Southern New Hampshire USA

Post by beetleman »

Your right Ken, they are a brighter red during the summer and turn this deep wine color for the winter. From reading about how winter hardy cactus survive the winter, they have to dehydrate their cells before the winter so the plant cells do not burst when frozen. I am not sure if that goes for all plants that do not loose their leaves in winter, but that might explain the winter color being different.
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
Doug Breda

DaveW
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Location: Nottingham, UK

Post by DaveW »

Cold hardy cacti do not survive cold and wet very well either, so they usually inhabit areas where cold but mainly dry conditions exist in winter, or at least where free water is usually not available because it is frozen. They are OK often covered with a blanket of snow which acts as insulation and does not thaw until the spring.

That is the reason we cannot grow them very well outside in the UK, in spite of the fact we are often not as cold as some experiance in habitat, but we have a freeze thaw, freeze thaw, sort of climate in winter which means they can get repeated wet and cold, which they will not tolerate.

My plants in the greenhouse have gone dry from the start of September and will not get their first watering until they show signs of new growth sometime next month. They are cold though, so you cannot do this in a warm room because they would then shrivel too much.

DaveW

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