Dragonfly in the rose garden

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MacroLuv
Posts: 1964
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:36 pm
Location: Croatia

Dragonfly in the rose garden

Post by MacroLuv »

Too much red? :D
Hi adminis, can you delete the picture 120_106_IMG_4004_0709_2.jpg? It is duplicated 120_106_IMG_4004_0709_1.jpg. It was done by accident. Sorry for the trouble.
If you want to see 2573 x 1714 (4.4 MP), 454,4 KB image click on this link.

Image

Model Canon EOS 400D DIGITAL
Date/time original 23.09.2007 13:51:00
Shutter speed value 1/640 s
Aperture value f/8
ISO speed ratings ISO 800
Focal length 100 mm

Image

Model Canon EOS 400D DIGITAL
Date/time original 23.09.2007 13:51:00
Shutter speed value 1/640 s
Aperture value f/8
ISO speed ratings ISO 800
Focal length 100 mm



Image

Model Canon EOS 400D DIGITAL
Date/time original 23.09.2007 13:58:39
Shutter speed value 1/320 s
Aperture value f/14
ISO speed ratings ISO 800
Focal length 100 mm
The meaning of beauty is in sharing with others.

P.S.
Noticing of my "a" and "the" and other grammar
errors are welcome. :D

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 22386
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Re: Dragonfly in the rose garden

Post by rjlittlefield »

MacroLuv wrote:Too much red? :D
Yes, and not just because it makes my eyes feel funny. :lol:

Do you see that bluish hue in the brightest areas of the petals? When you took the picture, those were actually the same color red as the rest of the petals, only brighter.

What's happening is that the exposure is so bright that the red channel is clamping at maximum value, while the other channels are still free to change with brightness. The result is that what should be all the same hue with different brightnesses, turns into different hues as well.

The same thing frequently happens with pictures of the sky if the sun is in the frame -- what should be blue sky turns cyan when the blue channel clamps at max while the green can still go up.

This problem can be very difficult to spot when the picture is taken, because cameras often don't indicate overexposure until more than one channel clamps. Probably your camera said this exposure was fine, even though it actually overexposed the red channel.

By the way, this problem is specific to digital cameras. Film doesn't clamp like this, so you don't get these sudden hue changes. That's one reason why film is still popular in the panorama community -- if you're shooting a full spherical panorama during the day, it's hard not to have the sun visible somewhere!

On the good side, though, the "neon glow" effect does make a fancy background for that dragonfly! :D

--Rik

PS. I'll take care of the spare image -- no problem.

MacroLuv
Posts: 1964
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:36 pm
Location: Croatia

Re: Dragonfly in the rose garden

Post by MacroLuv »

Thanks Rik. :D
rjlittlefield wrote:...By the way, this problem is specific to digital cameras. Film doesn't clamp like this, so you don't get these sudden hue changes. ...
Maybe Fujifilm already has some kind of solution with its extended dynamic range (100%, 200%, 400) and "film simulation". Wondering how it works. :-k
The meaning of beauty is in sharing with others.

P.S.
Noticing of my "a" and "the" and other grammar
errors are welcome. :D

Erland R.N.
Posts: 335
Joined: Mon Aug 07, 2006 5:20 pm
Location: Kolding, Denmark
Contact:

Post by Erland R.N. »

I see an old female Sympetrum striolatum (Common Darter) here.
I must say I like the 3rd picture most, with the more "common" light on the subject.

Erland

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