Colias on intense orange flower

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MacroLuv
Posts: 1964
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:36 pm
Location: Croatia

Colias on intense orange flower

Post by MacroLuv »

... continuing intense orange flower series with nice Colias butterfly. :D
Some past "intense orange flower" links: :wink:
Shield bugs on Zinnia flower
Jumping spider on intense orange flower
Spider on intense orange flower squirting liquid silk
Tiny crab spider on intense orange flower
Swallowtail on intense orange flower
Hawk moth on intense orange flower flicking pollen particles

Image

Model Canon EOS 400D DIGITAL
Date/time original 30.09.2007 15:15:22
Shutter speed value 1/320 s
Aperture value f/8
ISO speed ratings ISO 200
Focal length 100 mm
The meaning of beauty is in sharing with others.

P.S.
Noticing of my "a" and "the" and other grammar
errors are welcome. :D

Mike B in OKlahoma
Posts: 1048
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:32 pm
Location: Oklahoma City

Post by Mike B in OKlahoma »

Now that is orange and yellow! This reminds me a lot of one form of what I'd call a cabbage butterfly in America. I wonder if they are invasive species? But similar in appearance is very possible too!
Mike Broderick
Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Constructive critiques of my pictures, and reposts in this forum for purposes of critique are welcome

"I must obey the inscrutable exhortations of my soul....My mandate includes weird bugs."
--Calvin

rjlittlefield
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Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Mike B in OKlahoma wrote:...I'd call a cabbage butterfly in America.
Mike, I'll bet if you saw the topside of the wings, you'd call it a "sulphur". They're bright yellow, sometimes tending toward orange. Colias is the North American genus too. These things are closely related to the cabbage butterflies -- different genera in the same family.

BTW, the European Cabbage Butterfly or Cabbage White (Pieris rapae, not illustrated here) has a long reputation for being "invasive". However, the Pacific Northwest butterfly expert Robert Pyle, writing in "The Butterflies of Cascadia", argues against this interpretation.
(pg.139) Authors have alleged for decades that our native species of Pieris have retreated as a direct result of competitive exclusion by introduced Cabbage Whites. There's no doubt that some have diminished. But research by Francie Chew has shown conclusively that Cabbage Whites are tolerant of anthropogenic conditions, while the native whites have withdrawn before development and agriculture; and that some introduced crucifers attract oviposition, but prove lethal to larvae. Thus Cabbage butterflies have become a scapegoat for habitat displacement brought about by people.
Nikola, sorry for taking over your topic for a moment to give a mini-lecture on butterfly ecology, but somehow it just seemed appropriate. :wink:

Your photo is a very nice addition to the "intense orange flower" series! :D

--Rik

MacroLuv
Posts: 1964
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:36 pm
Location: Croatia

Post by MacroLuv »

Thanks guys. :D
It's OK Rik. You gave the better answer to Mike than I could. :wink:
By the way, do you see a hiding spider on the pic? 8)
The meaning of beauty is in sharing with others.

P.S.
Noticing of my "a" and "the" and other grammar
errors are welcome. :D

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