Among the largest trees in the world

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Erland R.N.
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Among the largest trees in the world

Post by Erland R.N. »

Among the largest trees in the world, in Yosemite National Park in California, I found these small red fungi, on a rainy day (22th May 2006).

I found three development stages.
Image
First one, like the two next, with Canon 5D, Sigma 50/2.8, all uncropped.

Image
This second one starting to open.

Image
This third picture I asume show the fully developed fungi.

Anyone from overseas ever seen these ?

cheers
Erland

Gordon C. Snelling
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Post by Gordon C. Snelling »

Actually it is not a fungus but a parasitic plant, commonly called snow plant
(Sarcodes sanguinea). Nifty plant..

JoanYoung
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Post by JoanYoung »

I have never seen anything like this Erland, they are very interesting. I like the third picture. About what size were they?
Joan Young

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Nice pictures!

This red flower is a close relative of the colorless flower shown by Doug Breda at http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/v ... php?t=3311. They are both in the small family Ericaceae. Another member of the family is the Pacific madrone, which for an apparently ordinary tree also has a pretty intimate relationship with soil fungi.

A good writeup on the little non-photosynthetic flowers is the one that Doug provided: http://botit.botany.wisc.edu/toms_fungi/oct2002.html. Fascinating stuff...

--Rik

JoanYoung
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Post by JoanYoung »

Rik: I found this article extremely interesting. Thanks Rik :)
Joan Young

Mike B in OKlahoma
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Post by Mike B in OKlahoma »

Very interesting, Erland. I hope you are enjoying your time on this side of the pond!
Mike Broderick
Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Constructive critiques of my pictures, and reposts in this forum for purposes of critique are welcome

"I must obey the inscrutable exhortations of my soul....My mandate includes weird bugs."
--Calvin

Erland R.N.
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Post by Erland R.N. »

Thank you very much for explaining what this is. Plants which are not dependent on photosyntese, interesting.

Mike, I can asure you I enjoy visiting America very much. My short visit to Yosemite was spoiled a bit by rain, but more important bad visibility up in the heights. Walked up along the oldest trail in the valley, only to find cold misty weather, and no views. You can't win every time :D

cheers
Erland

Bruce Williams
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Post by Bruce Williams »

Excellent posting - interesting series of pics and fascinating link to toms_fungi!

Bruce

beetleman
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Post by beetleman »

WOW :shock: You would never miss that red color. Excellent pictures Erland. Isn`t nature very strange. She likes to fill every nook & cranny with something strange and different. :smt023 I see some fungi under the red flower in picture #3 :wink:
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
Doug Breda

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