European Hornet, again...

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Ken Ramos
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European Hornet, again...

Post by Ken Ramos »

The size of these things makes one a bit cautious when attempting to get close for a photograph, however, they seem to be quite docile and not as agressive as our smaller, yellow and black marked hornets.

Image

Normally I associate fallen and rotten persimmons with Harvestmen or Daddy Longlegs, which are quite common beneath the persimmon tree after the fruit has fallen off and begins to put up a mild stench.

Image

On the otherhand, it seems that now when I find these trees bearing their ripened fruit, I will be on the lookout for these particularly large hornets. The hornet in the last image reminds me of myself...enjoying a plate of barbequed ribs, getting ones face in their plate so to speak. Hey, if you don't get it all over you, then it wasn't any good, eh? :D

JoanYoung
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Post by JoanYoung »

These are teriffic pics Ken. :D But they look like bees to me. LOL!! How do I tell the difference?
Joan Young

Ken Ramos
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Post by Ken Ramos »

There sheer size is one way to tell, around or a little over an inch, not much over and this thread here should explain a few things in the indentification. Betty (Planapo) and a few other members tell how. :D

Thanks Joan :D

Bruce Williams
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Post by Bruce Williams »

These two pics really compliment one another - the full story in two chapters so to speak. He looks to be completely engrossed with the task in hand and totally unconcerned about possible predators. Then I guess at that size (and colour) you don't need to be too worried!

Nice posting Ken.

Bruce

JoanYoung
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Post by JoanYoung »

Thanks Ken, this was very helpful information in the link you posted. :)
Joan Young

beetleman
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Post by beetleman »

What I am reading is this "Hornet" Vespa crabro, is the only true hornet in the USA. The White faced or bald faced Hornet ( Dolichovespula maculata) is supposed to be a wasp and not a true hornet. QUOTE "The true hornets make up the genus Vespa, and are distinguished from other vespines by the width of the vertex (part of the head behind the eyes), which is proportionally larger in Vespa; and by the anteriorly rounded gasters (the section of the abdomen behind the wasp waist)"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hornets
SEE ALSO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bald-faced_hornet
LOOK AT THE SIZE OF THIS GUY :shock: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HuMS3KDNysM
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
Doug Breda

Planapo
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Post by Planapo »

Nice find there again, Ken!

The feller on your pics seems to scarf down quite a bit of this persimmon, probably refuelling for further "cruisin´ the chicks", huh?! 8) :wink: :D
(Am I sounding too juvenile/rude here, or do you read me, hey, mother-tongue speakers?) :D

Btw, Ken, thanks for mentioning persimmon, I otherwise would have mistaken the fruit for a plum. Hadn´t heard of that tree and fruit before, but have just wikipedia-ed my ignorance.

Cheers,
Betty

beetleman
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Post by beetleman »

That is a verrrrrry ripe persimmon. usually they are a nice bright orange red color. You do have to eat them when they are very ripe (almost mushy). They are very yummy and sweet when perfect.
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
Doug Breda

tpe
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Post by tpe »

These are great, I was actually going to ask you in the last pic if these really do seem more docile than their bretheren, and how do you find out? I once got a (very clear behaviour) warning from a nest of vespular germanica that i was too close when they started divebombing my head, and luckily got away unscathed, but do these things have any warning behaviour so you can know before it is too late that it is time to leave?

tim

Ken Ramos
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Post by Ken Ramos »

Thanks everyone. :D I just assumed that persimmon trees were common most anywhere, that's what I get for assuming, of course we all know what to "assume" equates too. :lol: I really do not care for the taste of persimmons, a rather pungent sweetness to them I think but many enjoy the fruit and they are about the size of a good plum depending on the health of the tree. My backyard is full of them and the tree is so heavily laden that some of the limbs have broken off from the weight of the fruit. :|

As for the hornets, they are quite large and intimidating, though none cared or noticed when I approached them with a 100mm macro lens and shot a blinding stream of photons their way. Quite docile, I thought to myself, but still descretion is the better part of valor, well in this case anyway, so I moved on after grabbing a few pics. I watched them from a distance and still they paid no attention to my having been there nor did I recieve any friendly warning fly-bys. :D

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