Crab spider II. Up close with 65mm MP-E

Earlier images, not yet re-categorized. All subject types. Not for new images.

Moderators: rjlittlefield, ChrisR, Chris S., Pau

Charles Krebs
Posts: 5865
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:02 pm
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
Contact:

Crab spider II. Up close with 65mm MP-E

Post by Charles Krebs »

This afternoon I looked for the crab spider I had photographed and posted yesterday, and found it close to where it had been left off. The air was dead calm so I knew I would be able to take some long exposures. I coaxed the spider onto a white daisy and got out the Canon 65 MP-E. These three images were made using "natural" light (in the shade), with exposures of about 1.6 second at a "marked" f8. The spider would sometimes stay motionless in the same position long enough for me to shoot several exposures changing the focus slightly (to get extended DOF). The top two images are each composed of 3 frames combined in Helicon Focus. The bottom is 5 frames. (The bottom image is with the MP-E set at 5:1, the closest it will go. The other two are probably about 3.5 or 4:1.).

After my brief photo session I placed the spider back on the lavender where I had initially found it. When I checked back a short time later is had already caught its next meal... another honeybee!


Image

Image

Image

rjlittlefield
Site Admin
Posts: 22450
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:34 am
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA
Contact:

Post by rjlittlefield »

Wow! A virtuoso display of aesthetic beauty and technical prowess. :D

1.6 seconds per frame with a live specimen outside. :shock: :!:

This is just awesome, Charlie. "Crab spider with pollen" ?

--Rik

Mike B in OKlahoma
Posts: 1048
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 10:32 pm
Location: Oklahoma City

Post by Mike B in OKlahoma »

Not only 1.6 second exposures with a wild specimen, but STACKED groups of 3 to 5 shots! Wow.
Mike Broderick
Oklahoma City, OK, USA

Constructive critiques of my pictures, and reposts in this forum for purposes of critique are welcome

"I must obey the inscrutable exhortations of my soul....My mandate includes weird bugs."
--Calvin

beetleman
Posts: 3578
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:19 am
Location: Southern New Hampshire USA

Post by beetleman »

Simply incredible Charles. #3 is awesome :shock:
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
Doug Breda

Ken Ramos
Posts: 7208
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:12 pm
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

Post by Ken Ramos »

Beautiful as usual Charlie. I am assuming that the two red eyes are actually the primary eyes of the spider while the rest are nothing more than mere ocelli. :-k

DaveW
Posts: 1702
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:29 am
Location: Nottingham, UK

Post by DaveW »

"I am assuming that the two red eyes are actually the primary eyes of the spider while the rest are nothing more than mere ocelli"

Nah, it's red eye from flash on camera ! :evil: :D

Seriously, great shots, photostacking of a live subject is really pushing the boundaries. Good job spiders don't blink. Or do they?

DaveW

Charles Krebs
Posts: 5865
Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:02 pm
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
Contact:

Post by Charles Krebs »

Those two eyes were interesting. No flash was used. While taking the photos it was apparent that the spider could "rotate" or ""move" something under the surface that made the eye appear either red, black, or partially red/black when viewed from the same position. These two enlarged (consecutive) frames show what I mean. (They are at slightly different focus points so try to ignore the softness). Of particular interest is the "lower" red eye. If you look at about the 2:30 to 3 o'clock position off to the side of the eye socket you can see that it is darker in the right frame. I could observe this darker section moving about below the surface and as it moved about the eye would show various stages of red, black, and "partial". I didn't notice this with the other eyes.

Here is a quote from a web page dealing with jumping spiders. While it is a different species, and the two "AMEs" are much larger, perhaps something similar to what is described occurs with the crab spider.

From: http://tolweb.org/accessory/Jumping_Spi ... cc_id=1946
Jumping spiders have excellent vision, with among the highest acuities in invertebrates. The eight eyes are grouped four on the face (the two big Anterior Median eyes in the middle, and two smaller Anterior Lateral eyes to the side), and four on top of the carapace (two medium-sized eyes toward the back, and two very small eyes in front of them). You can think of the Anterior Median eyes (AME) as acting like our fovea, with high acuity but small field of view, and the remaining six eyes acting like our peripheral vision, with lower resolution but broad field of view...

... the AME's are long and tubular, which helps their resolution (longer focal length, more magnification) but which means they have a narrow field of view. Since the AME's have a narrow field of view, the spider needs to point them in different directions to see different things. To some extent this is done by moving the carapace, but the eyes can move as well. This is not done by moving the whole 'eyeball', since the lenses of the eyes are actually built into the carapace. Instead the retina moves around, while the lens stays fixed. This retinal movement is accomplished by some small muscles...
Image

Ken Ramos
Posts: 7208
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:12 pm
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

Post by Ken Ramos »

We are still getting "Infernal Sevice Errors!" :x :lol:

Pretty neat there Charlie, thanks. I suppose that explains the eye thing pretty much, doesn't it? So if, I am assuming, all eight of them are looking at you then they might all be red and that none of them are quite like ocelli, of which I thought six of them were. :-k That's what I get for thinking. :lol: Good info, thanks again :D

Walter Piorkowski
Posts: 693
Joined: Mon Aug 14, 2006 6:42 pm
Location: South Beloit, Ill

Post by Walter Piorkowski »

Truly beautiful Charles. What stunning backgrounds for this subject.
Walt

Post Reply Previous topicNext topic