Exidia glandulosa - Witch's butter

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Bruce Williams
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Exidia glandulosa - Witch's butter

Post by Bruce Williams »

Hi folks,

Here's an interesting (although fairly common) jelly fungus that grows on dead wood - in both cases aspect was open and south facing. Not sure where the name Witch's Butter comes from?

It's inedible (now that's a disappointment I hear you mutter...)

I found this quite a difficult subject to photograph as they were in full sun and their surface is quite reflective. It would have helped if I'd had something with me to reflect the light onto the shaded side too.

Bruce

Approx 4cm across longest axis.
Image

Approx 3cm top to bottom (forgot to shut aperture down on this one) .
Image

MacroLuv
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Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:36 pm
Location: Croatia

Post by MacroLuv »

Yummy! It looks very witchy. :D

Noodles In Witch's Butter

4 egg yolks; hard-cooked
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup sweet butter; softened
1 teaspoon dried thyme;
1 teaspoon dried sweet basil;
2 tablespoon orange flower water
1 lb noodles; cooked
1 orange; sliced

Beat the egg yolks, sugar, butter, thyme, basil, and orange water in a small bowl until smooth. Mix enough of the butter with the hot noodles to coat them with a golden-yellow color. Garnish with orange slices.

Witch's Warts In Butter

1/4 C. butter, cubed
8 oz. Semi-sweet chocolate
1/2 C. heavy cream
2 bags 3 MUSKETEERS® FUN SIZE® Bars, chopped into small pieces

Melt butter. Remove from heat and add the semi-sweet chocolate. Cover and let rest for about 3 minutes to melt the chocolate, then stir until smooth. Add the heavy cream gradually, stirring until totally incorporated and chocolate loses its shine. Refrigerate until slightly firm (approx. 20 - 30 minutes).

Roll into balls and then into chopped 3 MUSKETEERS® Bars, pressing gently to adhere.

Yields about 60 warts. :lol:
The meaning of beauty is in sharing with others.

P.S.
Noticing of my "a" and "the" and other grammar
errors are welcome. :D

Ken Ramos
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Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:12 pm
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

Post by Ken Ramos »

Where does he (Nikola) get these recipes? :smt017 A very dark and unsightly fungi there Bruce. I wonder what it would look like under the scope as a “squash prep?” :D

beetleman
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Location: Southern New Hampshire USA

Post by beetleman »

Very nice fungus shots Bruce. I like the sectional look of the second picture...sorta looks like a rotton brain. :wink: This is your brain...this is your brain on fungus!! (USA drug commercial)
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
Doug Breda

Ken Ramos
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Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:12 pm
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

Post by Ken Ramos »

You know they use a fungicidal treatment, amphotericin B, to treat people who have contracted Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM). It is caused by a tiny amoeba that invades the brain while swimming in lakes, streams, or areas of still stagnant water when the temperatures exceed 80°F during the hot months of summer. The amoeba invades the central nervous system via the tissues in the nasal cavity and then proceeds to attack the brain and other vital organs causing sever hemorrhaging of the brain, stiff neck, vomiting, sever headaches, seizures, coma, and eventually death, all in about 72 hours. Ain’t that something! :o Now what has that to do with Bruce's photograph of a Witch's Butter fungi? Well absolutely nothing I suppose. It is just that Doug mentioned brains and fungi and I remembered that amphotericin B is a fungicidal treatment that is all. :-k

Don't mind me...I'm just rattling around. You know how us old folks are. :roll:

DaveW
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Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:29 am
Location: Nottingham, UK

Post by DaveW »

"Where does he (Nikola) get these recipes?"

One day somebody will ask him how to boil an egg and that will stump him! :lol:

Bruce, one way to cut the harsh reflections a bit and to reduce contrast is to use a diffuser. This can be as simple as a square of the milk white opal plastic like they use over recessed flourescent light fittings used in suspended ceilings, or a simple square frame with white tissue paper or tracing paper glued to it, providing it imparts no colour cast.

You just hold this between the light (sun or artificial light) to diffuse the light falling on the subject. It's main problem is the chore or carrying it around! You can buy the Lastolight type circular fold up ones however in various sizes.



DaveW

Bruce Williams
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Location: Northamptonshire, England
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Post by Bruce Williams »

Thanks for the advice Dave. I have some spare material from an old light-box diffuser that could be sown around a circle of flexible wire. Will give that a try.

Bruce

DaveW
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Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:29 am
Location: Nottingham, UK

Post by DaveW »

Bruce,

Actually not 5 minutes ago I just bought one of these as I thought it would be handier to carry around than my bit of plastic because it folds up into a small bag. Plus it has a reversable white/silver/gold/black reflector for other photographic use that "zips" over the diffuser. It looks like the Lastolite type but cheaper.

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Lencarta-80cm-32- ... dZViewItem

DaveW

Bruce Williams
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Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2006 1:41 pm
Location: Northamptonshire, England
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Post by Bruce Williams »

Dave,
Thanks for tip. I have just purchased same.
Bruce

DaveW
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Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:29 am
Location: Nottingham, UK

Post by DaveW »

Bruce,

I am also assuming the black side will be OK for providing a black background behind a close-up subject if I need one, either zipped on the diffuser or if I need the diffuser as well, just zipped off and used like I use my piece of black velvet now.

DaveW

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