Red Admiral

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MacroLuv
Posts: 1964
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:36 pm
Location: Croatia

Red Admiral

Post by MacroLuv »

Red Admiral - Vanessa atalanta... and Marigold flower. :D

Image

Camera model Olympus SP-320
Date/time 07.10.2006/12:47:28
Exposure time 1/250 s
F-number f/7.1
ISO 64
Focal length 8 mm
The meaning of beauty is in sharing with others.

P.S.
Noticing of my "a" and "the" and other grammar
errors are welcome. :D

beetleman
Posts: 3578
Joined: Fri Aug 04, 2006 4:19 am
Location: Southern New Hampshire USA

Post by beetleman »

I don`t know why, but my marigolds usually do not attract anything execpt a stop over. I like the way the light is on his coiled tongue.
Take Nothing but Pictures--Leave Nothing but Footprints.
Doug Breda

Ken Ramos
Posts: 7208
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2006 2:12 pm
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

Post by Ken Ramos »

So that is what those are :D . I believe I found one here back in the summer that had bounced off of a passing vehicle out on the highway. It was raining that day and I was closing the gates to the plant where I work before going home, when I just happened to look down and there it was. Not really damaged, I placed it in a tissue and brought it home to look at with the microscope. Nice photograph there Nikola. :D

Closing the gates?...yeah, not the fist one to work but usually the last to leave. :wink:

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Nikola,

I know you're interested in language and like to play with it, so I'll pass along this info from Robert Pyle's The Butterflies of Cascadia.

Pyle calls this butterfly the "Red Admirable". He explains as follows (pg 334):
Though perhaps first and most widely known as the Red Admiral, Vanessa atalanta is actually a lady and has nothing to do with the admirals of the genus Limenitis. As E. B. Ford pointed out, the name Red Admirable goes back over 250 years. Nabokov strongly preferred it, considering "Red Admiral" an expression of "vulgar parlance." The species was conflated with the true admirals because they both have epaulette-like bands across black wings. Another traditional name, the Alderman, refers to ancient British ceremonial garb. An even older English title is Nettle Fly: Sir Winston Churchill struggled with his estate gardeners to keep nettles for this butterfly, which is famous for landing on people in their gardens, sometimes preferring the same person day after day.
--Rik

MacroLuv
Posts: 1964
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:36 pm
Location: Croatia

Post by MacroLuv »

Thank you very much guys! :D
And especially to Rik for the nice story.
Wish admirable lady lands on me some day. :wink: :lol:
The meaning of beauty is in sharing with others.

P.S.
Noticing of my "a" and "the" and other grammar
errors are welcome. :D

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