Search found 351 matches

by BJ
Sat Dec 21, 2019 6:43 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Dirty snow
Replies: 6
Views: 1206

hi,

long time since I posted but too interesting a topic.....

I think that the long serrated objects are phytoliths and perhaps derived from cereals eg corn.

boa sorte

Brian
by BJ
Tue Oct 02, 2018 9:56 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Lichen Placopsis gelida
Replies: 15
Views: 2376

Ralf,

as usual great images. Your series of lichen photos are always superb.

Thank you for posting,

regards,

brianO
by BJ
Mon Oct 31, 2016 7:44 am
Forum: General Discussion Forum and Community Announcements
Topic: Resource detailing diatom collection sites
Replies: 3
Views: 1356

hi,

i am not sure whether you have to join the group to access the files, but Steve Gill has made available to the yahoo diatom group a very comprehensive list of diatomite sites:

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/dia ... Diatomite/


enjoy!

Brian
by BJ
Fri Jan 29, 2016 1:45 pm
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Nuphar advena (water lily)
Replies: 10
Views: 1221

hi, it is nice when everyone is right ! bernhardinho is right they are trichomes....in this case 'trichosclereids', but tsavorite is right as well in that the rough granular texture of the trichomes is due to encrusting calcium oxalate crystals. See here for example: http://reviste.ubbcluj.ro/contri...
by BJ
Thu Jan 21, 2016 8:26 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: obscure North Sea diatom
Replies: 4
Views: 666

Hello René, a nice set of images and great dedication over a number of years. My impression is that they might be zygotes or auxospores of a pennate diatom. This could explain: 1. Why they do not look like any diatom you are familiar with 2. why the shape is very inflated 3. why the 'ornamentation' ...
by BJ
Mon Jan 04, 2016 8:15 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Unknown ? Alga for ID please
Replies: 5
Views: 700

Hello John, I agree 100% with Bernhardinho, these are fungal conidia.The group of fungi that produce them are known as 'aquatic hyphomycetes' - about 300 species are known. If you do an internet search you will see the range of unusual spores (conidia) that they produce. You should not be at all emb...
by BJ
Tue Dec 15, 2015 3:45 pm
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Unknown for ID please
Replies: 2
Views: 486

John,

I am almost certain that this is a fecal pellet....but what type of animal produced it? In the last image you can see remains of what it was feeding on which include a number of diatom valves. My guess would be a gastropod.

thank you for posting,

Brian
by BJ
Mon Nov 30, 2015 8:09 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Geranium robertianum (Herb Robert) "hair"
Replies: 11
Views: 1287

Hi, in reply to ChrisR, Charles has imaged (brilliantly as usual) a type III trichome (hair) which has five cells in the stalk. The pigmented cell contains and secretes flavonoids. See here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1756-1051.1990.tb02094.x/abstract Unfortunately, I do not have a...
by BJ
Sun Nov 22, 2015 8:02 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Charlie stomata
Replies: 5
Views: 816

Hello Michael, I think that the red stained areas are short glandular trichomes which would stick out from the surface and be pulled off with the peel. Although not very clear in your image, i think that you can see the arrangement of the cells in the base of the trichome. Compare perhaps with this ...
by BJ
Fri Nov 20, 2015 10:47 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Charlie stomata
Replies: 5
Views: 816

Michael, are you sure that the cells are actually present - could this be a cuticular peel or an acetate peel? My reason for thinking that this might be the case is that in your photos we see no 'side' cell walls and indeed no 'back' walls of the epidermal cells. If the epidermal cells were present,...
by BJ
Mon Oct 12, 2015 4:47 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Euglenoids
Replies: 4
Views: 497

Michael,

the images of Phacus are spectacular... as Charles said I do not think I have seen the side-on view before and I had never realised that they were so thin.

thank you for posting,

Brian
by BJ
Fri Oct 02, 2015 3:22 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Identification help.
Replies: 6
Views: 724

Hi,

I agree probably diatoms eg Cocconeis.

For example, have a look at this image:

http://www.freshwater-science.org/educa ... =5&iid=255


Brian
by BJ
Sat Sep 12, 2015 6:41 am
Forum: General Discussion Forum and Community Announcements
Topic: General identification keys
Replies: 4
Views: 1757

Hi, i do not know why i forgot to add this book: Ward and Whipple (1918) Freshwater Biology available online at: http://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/bibliography/28152#/details An encyclopedic work (over 1000 pages) with identification keys and excellent diagrams. Relates specifically to north Americ...
by BJ
Fri Sep 11, 2015 6:07 am
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Coccidiosis
Replies: 1
Views: 543

One very serious infection !

thank you for posting


Brian