Stephanitis pyrioides ("Azalea lace bug") nymphs

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Charles Krebs
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Stephanitis pyrioides ("Azalea lace bug") nymphs

Post by Charles Krebs »

My wife was wondering why the leaves on one of our rhododendrons looked so sickly. Now I can show her! I had posted a few images of the bizarre looking adults last fall, and here now are the nymphs. They go through five instars. When they molt they are nearly colorless, but soon turn dark brown/black. These are about the size of a small aphid.


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sonyalpha
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Post by sonyalpha »

WOW! Charles,

This is a thought provoking set of photographs that make the viewer ponder the wonders of Nature.......the last two are just amazing......they raise many questions:

For instance....what are the tiny globules along the antennae in the last but one shot:

Can we have an expert explanation of these bugs please?

They may be destructive but they ..........like my slimy slug....... are truly fascinating:

sonyalpha
Retired but not old in spirit:

Fairly new to photography........keen to learn:

Harold Gough
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Post by Harold Gough »

Stunning shots, Charles.

The adults are much more easily recognised. The name says it all:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/117625/bgimage

Harold
My images are a medium for sharing some of my experiences: they are not me.

Joaquim F.
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Post by Joaquim F. »

An awesome serie, Bravo!!!

Cheers

Joaquim

jotafoto
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Post by jotafoto »

Impressive Charles:

How have you done to make the stacks? there are dead? With What optical?.
You do not stop surprising us.
best regards

Javier

RogelioMoreno
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Post by RogelioMoreno »

Charles,

Beautiful set.

Rogelio

morfa
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Post by morfa »

Gorgeous series Charles! The lighting in #4 is really something :shock:

Charles Krebs
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Post by Charles Krebs »

Thanks!

Javier... #1, 3, and 4 are the Mitutoyo 10X (with either 150mm or 240mm tube lens); #2 is the 21mm JML lens, the last is a 40X SLWD 40X Nikon M Plan.

John... the lighting on #4 and #5 is done using a stereo microscope darkfield condenser (inexpensive Chinese, Ebay purchase). Dramatic light, but with this subject a real nightmare to stack. I also used it for the ant in the "ant, iris, beetle" post, but there I also used an additional diffused top light as well.

sontalpha... don't know about the "globules". At first I thought it might be condensation, but it has a slightly "sticky" consistency, and I find them on specimens that are still outside dining on my rhody.

svalley
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Post by svalley »

WOW! These are really amazing Charlie. I like the last 2 the best.

You could taste your leaves (in the interest of science) to see if the sticky substance is sweet. :P

Steve
"You can't build a time machine without weird optics"
Steve Valley - Albany, Oregon

Aynia
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Post by Aynia »

Really superb photos Charlie. :D

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