www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - Yellow rose with aphids
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Yellow rose with aphids

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Nature Photography -- Macro and Close-up
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 17695
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2008 2:19 pm    Post subject: Yellow rose with aphids Reply with quote



Despite a couple of hard frosts, this yellow rose keeps blooming.
Apparently mommy aphid hasn't quite given up for the year either! Very Happy

--Rik

Technical: Canon 300D with Sigma 105 macro at 1:1, 1/250 at f/16, flash, handheld, crop to 75%.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Planapo



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1533
Location: Germany, in the United States of Europe

PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 7:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rik, I like that picture very much. I think it´s due to the "landscape" that the rose petals create, and the various contrasts in size, quantity and colour which form between adult vs. offspring and between grouped, dark aphids vs. light background.

BTW, when reading
Quote:
Despite a couple of hard frosts ...

once more I am surprised about the local climate at your place. I was already when looking over your shoulder and rucksack back then in this photo, realizing that it´s more arid and that irrigation is used in agriculture at your place.
I had thought of the whole of WA as more influenced by the sea and hence the climate moister and milder. But obviously, behind the costal range the conditions are much more continental than I had expected.

--Betty
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 17695
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 8:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Betty, thanks for the compliment on the picture. I thought it came out well. Quite well, considering the circumstances. This rose was sitting on top of a 3-foot stalk, in a bed of miniature roses. No tripod handy, hardly any place to stand, and nothing to brace against. So there I was, macro rig in hand, bent over at the waist, cantilevered out over another bush, trying to hold framing and push the expose button to synchronize with the aphid swooping in and out of focus. What a stupid way to try taking a picture! But I like how it came out. Sometimes you get lucky. Smile

About the climate of Washington, well, there are a whole bunch of different climates in this little state. In some places on the coast, it can get very wet. (Hoh Rain Forest, annual precipitation 12-14 feet). Inland of the Cascade Mountains, it's generally pretty dry. I live in a particularly dry spot, average annual precipitation 7.1 inches) (ref). Likewise for temperature swings. The median date of first frost here is October 17, so I guess this is a pretty typical year.

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Aynia



Joined: 01 May 2008
Posts: 724
Location: Europe somewhere

PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 9:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really like the clarity/detail on the wing on this one.

Did you think about rotating it? Then you might have little ones following mommy.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 17695
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2008 11:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



Aynia wrote:
Did you think about rotating it?

Good idea.

Normally I shy away from rotating anything away from its natural orientation, for fear of misrepresenting the subject. For example, it would be unusual to find aphids exposed on the "top" surface of a petal like this.

But I agree that it's a lot easier on the eyes this way. Very Happy

About the detail, here's a closer crop. You can see some things here that get lost in the wider frames. I had not noticed the three droplets of stuff on the rear cornicle.



--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Nature Photography -- Macro and Close-up All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group