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Still-life on a tree stump

 
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 18254
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 9:31 am    Post subject: Still-life on a tree stump Reply with quote





Dense shade, in a picnic area high in the mountains of Idaho. The tree appears to have been freshly cut, but apparently the core was rotten to start with. (Probably the reason they took it down.)

--Rik

Technical: Canon A710, 1/8 second f/8, handheld. Total field width about 6 inches in image #1. The coin is a U.S. quarter, 24 mm diameter.

Edit #1: to fix typo in title.
Edit #2: to add diameter of a quarter, per discussion HERE.


Last edited by rjlittlefield on Sun Aug 23, 2009 4:29 pm; edited 2 times in total
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Planapo



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1533
Location: Germany, in the United States of Europe

PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 11:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
in a picnic area high in the mountains of Idaho


Aha Rik, there you are! Very Happy
I best like the ant (of course!) in the upper left corner of the first pic.

Wishing you a nice time there!
And BTW, I´d be looking forward to seeing landscape photos of these Idaho mountains over in the 'favourite locations' department! Wink

--Betty
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jmlphoto



Joined: 10 Aug 2007
Posts: 269

PostPosted: Wed Jun 25, 2008 3:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nice fungi, and also the new seedlings starting too.
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Adrian



Joined: 24 Aug 2006
Posts: 191
Location: Australia

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 5:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i like the shot with the coin in it
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Ken Ramos



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 6997
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I really like the perspective on the first shot. Very Happy The ant reminds me of the tourists who come here, ignoring the safety margins and look over the edge of a cliff on a mountain side. Opps! Laughing
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 18254
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the comments, folks!

The big mushroom was the first thing that caught my attention. Then when I looked closer, I saw how much more there was going on in this little scene. The snail is dead, I think, just judging from the way it's kind of lying on its side. Everything else seems very much alive, especially the ant that showed up midway through shooting.

Adrian, when I shot the coin I was intending it to be just a record shot, so I would know the scale. But after I saw it on screen, I decided it was interesting enough to include in the posting. Besides, when used as an inset, it covered up some annoying OOF blobs in the upper corner of that second picture. Glad you liked it!

--Rik
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rovebeetle



Joined: 22 May 2008
Posts: 308
Location: Vienna, Austria

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beautiful shot, Rik! I like such still life images. So much to be discovered.

BTW - the DOF of those P&S cameras always amazes me. Almost impossible with a DSLR and a conventional Macro lens in a one-shot solution.

Those Pholiota mushrooms are very decorative.

Cheers
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Harry,

Thanks for the compliment and the ID on the mushroom -- most appreciated!

Regarding DOF, well, that always makes a complicated discussion. Bottom line is that a DSLR actually can get the same DOF as a compact digital, but the settings to do it will be very different -- more like f/32 instead of the f/8 used here. There's been a lot written in the forums on this issue, but I don't have the references handy. I can track them down later if you're interested.

--Rik
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rovebeetle



Joined: 22 May 2008
Posts: 308
Location: Vienna, Austria

PostPosted: Sat Jun 28, 2008 11:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
more like f/32 instead of the f/8 used here.


Rik, I know, but at f/32 you usually exceed the diffraction limit by a long way. I have only one lens which is able to do f/32 without any serious signs of diffraction: the Micro-Nikkor 85/2.8 PC. All other lenses start having problems beyond f/11-16. Well, not necessarly at web size Smile .

Cheers
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rjlittlefield
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 12:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, it all scales. The smaller sensor suffers the same diffraction effects at f/8 as the DSLR does at f/32. That's why the A710 and similar small-sensor cameras only go down to f/8. This topic has further discussion, but the first few postings may be confusing. A good place to start is with this post, part way through the topic.

--Rik
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Walter Piorkowski



Joined: 14 Aug 2006
Posts: 655
Location: South Beloit, Ill

PostPosted: Sun Jun 29, 2008 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A very neat image Rik, I like it.
Walt
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Cyclops



Joined: 05 Aug 2006
Posts: 2968
Location: North East of England

PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 3:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Very nice Rik! I like that snail there- would have had to get a close up of him!
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