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Another Cleptoparasitic Bee

 
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Ken Ramos



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 7058
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2008 6:44 pm    Post subject: Another Cleptoparasitic Bee Reply with quote


Cuckoo Bee
Canon EOS 20D
Manual mode, hand held
1/125 sec. @ f/7.1 ISO 100
Canon EF-100mm f/2.8 Macro USM
Canon 430EX Speedlite ETTL @ -1/3, off camera w/Novoflex bracket
PP: Photo Impact 6 Very Happy

Quite an unsual occurance here. The same type of bee I posted a few days ago, at least I think it is, but there were about three or four others along with this one, all attached or clinging to the stems of a small bush down in the woods, by their mouth parts. Shocked None seemed to be moving, with the exception of one other noted clinging to a small stem off of a tree limb. Every so often that one would stand on its hind legs and stroke the antennae with its forelegs and then wonder on randomly about the stem, back and forth. Rolling Eyes Think Some of you may know what I am thinking but it could be nothing at all, just something that I am not familar with, still I am going to keep an eye on them to see if they still persist on the stems. Wink
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jaharris1001



Joined: 29 Jun 2007
Posts: 319
Location: Deltona Florida

PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2008 7:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

how unusual Ken,, they were clinging on to a leaf with thier mouths,, very different,, I was wondering what was happening with its abdoman,, nice shot here though Wink
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Ken Ramos



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 7058
Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

PostPosted: Sun Apr 13, 2008 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Of course I am thinking Cordyceps here, however, I may just be jumping to conclusions because I know nothing about most insects if any thing at all. There has to be some life in the bee because the eyes have not faded. Probably, as I afore mentioned, something or some sort of behavior I am not familar with. Think

Thanks Jim Very Happy
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beetleman



Joined: 04 Aug 2006
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Location: Southern New Hampshire USA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 3:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great photos Ken. I remember a post of a bee doing that and someone said it was sleeping or resting. You would think the end of a stem with your butt hanging out would not be a good way to rest Laughing
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Ken Ramos



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
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Location: lat=35.4005&lon=-81.9841

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 4:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I sort of figured it might be something like that Doug but I didn't know. Yeah I can think of a lot better ways to rest than hanging off a branch by my teeth. Laughing

Thanks Doug Very Happy
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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
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Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 7:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If I went by visual impressions I would say that the insect was trapped by some powerful plant-generated adhesive which was holding its mouthparts in situ where they had touched (bitten?) a (baited flower?) of an insectivorous plant. The legs would have started by gripping the foliage, the abdomen curved forward to permit this but the muscles would eventually have become exhausted and the body straigtened up.

The above is probably far from the truth but perhaps it fits the visual evidence.

Harold
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Ken Ramos



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 7:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey...any port in a storm there Harold. Laughing

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Harold Gough



Joined: 09 Mar 2008
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Location: Reading, Berkshire, England

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 7:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ken Ramos wrote:
Hey...any port in a storm there Harold. Laughing

Thanks Very Happy


You recognise my strategy! Wink

Harold
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Ken Ramos



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 8:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have since went out to check on them. They were still there and I placed two of them in a small 15ml. vial and brought them in. They and the vial are, at present, in a killing jar. Soon I will take a much closer look through the dissecting microscope and post the images in the micro forum, linking back to this one and vice versa. Very Happy
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Planapo



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
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Location: Germany, in the United States of Europe

PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Doug remembered correctly. This is a sleeping/resting posture that occasionally quite some solitary bee species can be found in. They take such a posture during the night, but also to outlast a cold and rainy period during which they are not active. Sometimes you can find them soaking wet hanging there in the rain.

I regularly find Osmia florisomnis in the Campanula flowers in our backyard garden. So, in case you have Campanula in your garden it´s worth checking 'em out on summer mornings or during cold and rainy days.
And btw, in this case the latin species name already exactly describes this behaviour: florisomnis translates to flower-sleeping.
A bee sleeping in a flower - romantic isn´t it?!

But now it looks like a romance has come to a sudden end in a killing jar. Neutral Confused

--Betty
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Ken Ramos



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 14, 2008 10:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Betty wrote:
Quote:
But now it looks like a romance has come to a sudden end in a killing jar.


Not to worry, they survived the ordeal of the "killing jar" quite well. Very Happy Though they now probably have brain damage and are now listening to Jimmi Hendrix and Pink Floyd albums, mellowing out to Grateful Dead. I placed them in the jar long enough to immobilize them and then photographed them, and then removed them to fresh air where they revived and crawled off with what could be assumed as a massive hangover. Laughing
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tonygt19



Joined: 16 Feb 2008
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Location: PA and MD,USA

PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 7:48 am    Post subject: A tattoo perhaps? Reply with quote

The smiley face just behind the "elbow" joint of the front leg is a nice touch.
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Ken Ramos



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PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tonygt19 replied:
Quote:
The smiley face just behind the "elbow" joint of the front leg is a nice touch.


I had not noticed that. Think Good observation. Wink

Thanks Tony Very Happy
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